From the monthly archives: "August 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth probably, but maybe butterfly?
Location: N. Central Saskatchewan, Canada
August 30, 2016 8:04 pm
I have googled this until my eyes went googly!
This probably moth was fluttering in an awkward moth type way, visiting flowers during the daytime yesterday. I am located in N. Central Saskatchewan Canada
I was curious as to what sort of moth it is, if it is indeed a moth. I’ve never seen one before and now have 20 or more people actively googling images and descriptions to no avail. Do you have any idea what it is?
Signature: Tami Z

I have found the ID of this moth so you may ignore my request and thank you for your effort!  It was ID’d as a celery looper moth.  It might be a bit out of it’s range but it was a warm winter. Thank you!

Celery Looper Moth

Celery Looper Moth

Dear Tami,
Thanks for getting back to us with a correct identification of your Celery Looper Moth,
Anagrapha falcifera.  We are pleased to be able to post your wonderful image that matches this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on large variety of low plants: beet, blueberry, cabbage, carrot, celery, clover, corn, lettuce, plantain, Viburnum species. Adults nectar on flowers of various herbaceous plants” and “Adults are active day and night, and are attracted to light.”  You were quite lucky having a team of 20 helping you with the identification.  Sometimes identifications can be quite time-consuming.

Thank you for the follow up. You`re right – ID can be really time consuming but what a fun challenge!
It was a first for me, but when you start googling grey and brown moths you realize how may firsts are yet to come!

Indeed, many moths are brown or drab in color, and many look very similar, which is why we often stop at a general family identification.  The fact that this moth was observed flying during the day is an unusual characteristic, and searching with the term diurnal early may have yielded quicker results.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red admiral camoflage
Location: Troy, VA
August 31, 2016 8:47 am
I thought you might like these photos I took of a red admiral beautifully camoflaged against tree bark. I saw the butterfly land and grabbed my camera. When I looked through the viewfinder, it had disappeared. I looked again and realized it was just magnificently camoflaged. Looking at it with the naked eye, it was invisible. I’ve included one photo of the butterfly with its wings open.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Dear Grace,
Thanks for sending us your marvelous images illustrating the camouflage ability of the Red Admiral.  Many butterflies with brightly colored wings have brown, camouflage patterns on the undersides, including morphos, leaf butterflies and anglewings.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and yellow caterpillar
Location: London, Ontario Canada
August 31, 2016 1:43 pm
Hello…
I’m not sure that I’ve seen one of these around here before. Could you please be so kind as to ID it if possible?
Thanks!
Signature: Mike

Paddle Caterpillar

Paddle Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
Commonly called the Paddle Caterpillar, this is the larva of a Funerary Dagger Moth which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, apple, birch, blueberry/huckleberry (Vaccinium spp.), cottonwood, dogwood, elm, hazel, hickory, maple, oak, willow.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck?!
Location: Tuscaloosa, Alabama
August 29, 2016 10:03 pm
I’ve never seen one of these before in my life and now they’re crowding around on of our lights outside. We don’t have the problem on the other side of the house. These things love to dive bomb me too.
Are they poisonous? Do they bite? How do I make them go away!?
Signature: Joanna

Leaf Footed Bugs

Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear Joanna,
These are Leaf Footed Bugs in the genus
Leptoglossus, and they are native to your area.  They are not poisonous.  We have never gotten a report of a person being bitten, but we would not discount that possibility.  Turning off the lights that are attracting them will solve your problem.

Leaf Footed Bugs

Leaf Footed Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious Insect
Location: Georgia
August 29, 2016 10:06 pm
Hi. Came across this insect on my front porch. I have never seen anything like it! I’m hoping you can tell me what it is. Thank you!
Signature: Anna Rovolis

Grizzled Mantis

Grizzled Mantid

Dear Anna,
This little beauty is a female Grizzled Mantid, a native predator.  Also known as a Lichen Mimic Mantid, this species is very well camouflaged on tree bark, which might explain why you have never before noticed one.

Thank you for the info!!
Thanks,
Anna

Hi Anna,
Your posting has already gotten 101 Facebook “likes” on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified prehistoric beetle
Location: Lake City, Missouri, USA
August 29, 2016 2:07 pm
Hello,
This thing came crawling up my co-workers desk today! Internet searches have yielded no information. Perhaps a sort of Bristle tail? Can you identify it?
Size: 1.5″ long
Date: 8/29/16
Location: Lake City Missouri
Thank you!
Ben
Signature: However you choose

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Ben,
Mole Crickets like yours, because of their large size and unusual appearance, are among our most common identification requests from all over the world.  Though primarily subterranean, Mole Crickets are capable of flying.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination