From the monthly archives: "July 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grapevine Beetle
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
July 25, 2016 2:44 pm
Unusual find for our location, and we have no grapevines nearby. Beautiful beetle.
Signature: Derek

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Dear Derek,
You are correct that this is a Grapevine Beetle, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on grape (Vitis) foliage and fruit, both wild and cultivated species. Not a serious pest. Larvae host on dead
Acer, Celtis, Juglans, Malus, Platanus, Quercus, Ulmus spp.”  Though we don’t want to take the time to research all genera of larval hosts, they include maple, walnut, oak and elm and we are relatively certain some of those trees are found nearby.  Also, the adult plant host list might be incomplete.  Folks who want to start butterfly gardens quickly learn that if they do not have caterpillar host plants to produce the butterflies, they will not have many visitors to the flowers they plant.

Grapevine Beetle (image lightened)

Grapevine Beetle (image lightened)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beatle/cockroach looking monstrosity
Location: northern new jersey suburbs
July 25, 2016 1:10 pm
Dear bugman,
Hello old sport was wondering if you could help me I.d. this scoundrel. Only have seen them at night, mostly seen flying into my garage from the outside. My brother says they fly sort of upright rather than parallel to the ground. Summer time in Northern New Jersey Suburbia. Checked numerous bug data bases of new jersey insects and came up empty handed. Thanks!
Signature: Gene Jefferson

Dead Brown Prionids

Dead Brown Prionids

Dear Gene,
These are Brown Prionids,
Orthosoma brunneum, and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in poles, roots(?) in contact with wet ground” so they may be emerging from dead stumps you have in the vicinity.  They are also attracted to lights.  We are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage as these two Brown Prionids do not look like they died of natural causes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of fly is this?
Location: Chatham, ON, Canada
July 26, 2016 6:31 am
Hi. Recently, I took a picture of this fly on my car and I’m not sure what kind it is. Most people say it’s a horse fly but I’m not sure. Any idea?
Signature: Al

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Dear Al,
This certainly is a Horse Fly, and upon scrolling through BugGuide pages, we believe we have correctly identified it as
Tabanus stygius.  According to BugGuide‘s data, this wide ranging species is found in Ontario.  We cannot tell from your image if this is a female or a male as the space between the eyes is not visible, but only female Horse Flies are blood-sucking biters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Lashed Beauty in Colorado
Location: Pueblo, Colorado
July 25, 2016 11:13 pm
Dear Bugman,
Curious what type lashed bug this might be. I found it on my front porch one evening about 2 weeks ago, early July. It was maybe an inch and a half or so. Hoping you can help.
Signature: Curious friend

Lined June Beetle

Lined June Beetle

Dear Curious Friend,
This is a Lined June Beetle in the genus Polyphylla, and according to BugGuide:  “Large June beetles, most with obvious white scales on elytra often forming stripes. Species identification often difficult.”  It might be a Ten Lined June Beetle,
Polyphylla decemlineata, which does range as far east as Colorado.  What you have called “lashes” are actually the flabellate or fan shaped antennae that characterize the male June Beetles in this genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Vermont fly
Location: Vermont
July 25, 2016 7:29 pm
Hey. My buddy was doing work in VT today andd saw this fly on the tower he’s working on. He is curious what it is. Thank you.
Signature: Dan H

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Dan,
This Elm Sawfly is actually a non-stinging relative of Bees and Wasps, and not a true fly.

Thank you for your quick reply. You nailed the identification. Thank you so much and keep up the great work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this a deerfly?
Location: Hampshire, Illinois
July 25, 2016 3:17 pm
Hello, Bugmam!
I live in Hampshire Illinois, this guy showed up on my deck, I thought it was a moth and approached it flew at me, and wouldn’t stop I had to run ….literally …run into the house.
Can you tell me what it is called, besides what I called it…lol
I think it is some type of Deerfly. I may be wrong.
Signature: Gerardine Baugh

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Gerardine,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly and it neither bites nor stings, nor does it have venom or poison, so it is perfectly harmless, but that it not to say it cannot hurt you.  Imagine, if you will, if while you were running away from this harmless creature you tripped and fell and broke your leg.  Though we don’t know why this harmless Tiger Bee Fly flew at you, there was really no harm it could have done had it landed on you.  According to BugGuide, the Tiger Bee Fly “is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees,
Xylocopa.”

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for this information. When I see it again I will take more pictures, and watch to see what it is up to.
Gerardine

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination