From the monthly archives: "July 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please ID
Location: Paramount CA
July 27, 2016 7:05 pm
Its late July when I felt something near my armpits the stretch mark area there was something ive never seen and I know more than your average person about wild life.
Signature: Brian

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Dear Brian,
This is a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, and according to BugGuide:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.  The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.”

Daniel,
Thanks for your service.  Should I see a doctor?

Dear Brian,
While we cannot say for certain if you have cause to see a doctor, your interaction with this Glassy Winged Sharpshooter is no cause for concern.  The bacterium mentioned is a disease agent for grape vines, not people.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Cyprus
July 28, 2016 3:35 am
This insect is currently in my garden in Cyprus, I think it is a moth but as it is out in daytime I am not sure. I hope you can help!
Signature: Peter

Levant Hawkmoth

Levant Hawkmoth

Dear Peter,
You are correct that this is a moth, and moths are not limited to nocturnal flights.  There are many species that are diurnal, flying during daylight hours.  We are confident we have properly identified your individual as a Levant Hawkmoth,
Theretra alecto, thanks to the Cyprus Discovery website.  According to Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic, despite being “The commonest sphingid in Lebanon, apart from Macroglossum stellatarum … Little is known about the behaviour of this species except that it is attracted to flowers and light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Southwest Virginia
July 27, 2016 5:38 am
I found this bug in my house on a windowsill. I have never seen it before.
Signature: Terry Volant

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Terry,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood” and “Notorious for emerging from furniture after as many as 10-40 yrs.”  You just need to determine if this individual happened to wander in from the outside or if it emerged from a piece of furniture you have in your home.  We tend to lean toward the former.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Soldier Beetle?
Location: Massachusetts
July 27, 2016 4:51 am
We just had a large hatch of these, and hope that they are not enemies of my garden.
Signature: Farmer Bob

Banded Net-Wing

Banded Net-Wing

Dear Farmer Bob,
We just finished posting an especially lurid image of a group of Banded Net-Wing beetles, also from Massachusetts.  According to the genus page on BugGuide:  “adults take nectar; larvae prey on small arthropods under bark”
which would make them a beneficial species in your garden.

Thanks Daniel!
I found a similar lurid scene atop my car this morning.
Bob

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What beetle
Location: Central MA
July 27, 2016 4:11 am
A friend thinks a costa Rican beetle I think they were showing off
Signature: Inazuma Hiro

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Dear Inazuma,
In a sense, you and your friend are both correct.  These are Banded Net-Wing beetles,
Calopteron reticulatum, and based on this Alamy image, the species ranges as far south as at least Costa Rica.  You image depicts quite a mating frenzy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Sawfly larva?
Location: South Surrey, BC, Canada
July 24, 2016 12:18 pm
Hi Bugman,
I came upon several of these in my garden in South Surrey, BC, Canada in June, 2016. South Surrey is south of Vancouver, BC, near White Rock, just north of the USA border (WA State) — just in case your readers aren’t familiar with the local geography.
I had no idea what they are, but I think they look like your photo of a Sawfly larva. Are they harmful to plants or beneficial insects?
Thanks for your help.
Signature: Jerry Steinberg

Millipedes

Flatbacked Millipedes

Dear Jerry,
These are NOT Sawfly larvae.  They are Flatbacked Millipedes,
Harpaphe haydeniana, and according to BugGuide:  “This particular millipede secretes a dark fluid that has an odor similar to the almond extract used in cooking. Apparently this is a defensive manuveur. Millipedes also curl up in tight coils when threatened.  Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up.”  According to Island Nature:  “the millipede can perform its duty as a ‘macroshredder,’ breaking up plant material and initiating the process of nutrient recyclying [sic] in the soil ecosystem … . In fact, it plays such an important role in the process that it can be considered to be a “keystone” species.”

Thanks so much!
Keep up the GREAT work!
Jerry

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination