From the monthly archives: "July 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: borer ?
Location: Fredericksburg Va
July 30, 2016 7:29 pm
………….rainy times after hot dry spell
It was inside the house under a table lamp
A cloudy morning
Alive and still
One inch
Fredericksburg , Virginia
If it’s a borer of a tree of some sort…..we have MANY trees and many types>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
July 30th
If it”s a borer…it would be good to know its habitat!
Signature: susan warner

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Susan,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood.”  According to MoBugs:  “Deciduous woodlands and the nearby area is their favored habitat, but they will often come to lights at night. Females deposit eggs on hardwood trees, usually in the cracks of bark. (Let me clarify here, they will only feed on dead or decaying trees, they will not harm healthy living trees…Thanks Ted for pointing out my oversight).When the larvae hatches it will eat its way into the heartwood of the tree. They feed on the wood pulp. Adults will readily come to fermented molasses bait. In large numbers these beetles could become serious pests to trees, and can cause significant damage. Because of their boring habit, and their capability of reaching the center of even the largest of trees it is not uncommon for these beetles to emerge as much as 10 to 40 years later in wood that was used to make furniture or hardwood flooring.”  We suspect this individual was probably attracted to light or had some other accidental reason for appearing in your home, but we would not rule out the possibility that it might have emerged from some finished wood product or firewood stored indoors.  Since today is the last day of July, and it is time for us to select a new Bug of the Month, we will be featuring your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Witch Moth
Location: Carlsbad, NM
July 30, 2016 9:36 pm
This evening, around twilight, I was backing out of my garage when I saw what I thought was a bat flitting around inside the garage. I stopped the car and went to safely shoo it out. It had landed upside down on the raised garage door. I was very surprised to find no bat but a huge brown moth. It was easily 6 inches from wing tip to wing tip. I took a few photos, and then gently moved it out. It landed on the wood frame of the garage door, where I took some better photos using the car headlights for illumination. I love the little commas on the shoulders.
I don’t recall ever seeing this type of moth before. I looked on your site under “large brown moth”, and I think I’ve matched it to Black Witch Moth, male. According to what I read, they are usually tropical but can be found in the U.S. occasionally. We’ve had a very hot summer with 20+ days over 100 degrees. I don’t know if that’s what brought this guy north. Looking at your site, I found several Black Witch Moth submissions, but I didn’t find one from 2016, so I thought I’d send these in.
I love your site and use it all the time.
Signature: Curious

Male Black Witch

Male Black Witch

Dear Curious,
You are correct that this is a male Black Witch and you are also correct that this is our first 2016 report, and we are thrilled that there is such a wonderful, high quality image to accompany the posting.  Northern migrations of Black Witch Moths from Mexico have been documented for over 100 years, and the start of the migration seems to be linked to the monsoon season in Mexico, but no one is certain why the migration includes reports from as far north as Alaska.  The Black Witch is a huge moth that is capable of flying great distances, which may lead to range expansions, but potential larval food plants tend to be confined to warmer climates as the trees upon which the caterpillars feed cannot survive colder winters.  Texas Entomology has information on Black Witch migrations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aquatic nymph as prey?
Location: Alexandria, VA
July 30, 2016 5:18 pm
Hi, I observed and photographed a Green Heron capture what I think might be a dragonfly naiad or some other aquatic nymph today at Huntley Meadows in Alexandria, Virginia. I wouldn’t expect a species ID, but do you think this is even an insect? I can’t think of another possibility…. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Dear Seth,
What marvelous images you have submitted.  This larva appears to be a Water Tiger, the predatory, aquatic larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the genus
Dytiscus.  This posting is a marvelous addition to our Food Chain tag.

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Northeast Ohio, Youngstown
July 30, 2016 5:33 pm
Found this bug in my kitchen… It’s 8:30 PM EST in northeast Ohio on July 30,2016. It’s about 75 degrees Fahrenheit, and we’ve been having some unusually warm and humid weather. Just wondered what this little guy is. 🙂
Signature: Mindy

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Dear Mindy,
This is an Ailanthus Webworm Moth, a species with caterpillars that feed on the leaves of the invasive Ailanthus Tree or Tree of Heaven.  On a totally different note, did you go to see Hillary Clinton speak at East High School today?  We have relatives in the Youngstown area, including mom who is 87 and lives in Campbell, Ohio, where our editorial staff was born and raised.  We have also been closely following the Mill Creek Park drama, and we personally feel it is very unfortunate when we hear how mismanagement has resulted in controversial and unfair job terminations there, and how the park is falling into a very sad state due to lack of proper staffing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: One very strange bug….
Location: North of Seattle, Wa
July 30, 2016 4:10 pm
My cat was staring at this bug that got inside and first I thought it was a wasp so I picked it up and tossed it in the toilet and it started skeeting around
on the water so I took the below photos. I have no Idea what it is. Can you help?
I picked it up and put it outside
Can you help???
Signature: Don Everest

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Don,
This Black and Yellow Mud Dauber,
Sceliphron caementarium, actually is a wasp, and we are curious how you “picked it up and put it outside.”  The Black and Yellow Mud Dauber is a solitary wasp, and it is not an aggressive species, however, females are able to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults nectar at flowers; mud nests are built in all kinds of sheltered locations, incl. man-made structures, rock ledges, etc. Adults collect mud for nests at puddle/pool edges” and “nests are provisioned with spiders; adults common at flowers(3), especially parsnip and water parsnip, and visit hummingbird feeders.”  Because you took pity on this Black and Yellow Mud Dauber, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classy black beetle with orange dot. Not a lady bug.
Location: Troy, VA
July 30, 2016 12:45 pm
I saw this beetle last night and I think he is terribly elegant. I’m very curious as to what it is, I can’t find beetles like it with one orange dot. He does, alas, seem to be missing at least one leg.
thank you
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Polyphore Fungus Beetle:  Penthe obliquata

Polyphore Fungus Beetle: Penthe obliquata

Dear Grace,
This is a Polyphore Fungus Beetle in the family Tetratomidae,
Penthe obliquata, and we identified it in Arthur E. Evans wonderful book “Beetles of Eastern North America”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination