From the daily archives: "Saturday, July 30, 2016"

Subject: aquatic nymph as prey?
Location: Alexandria, VA
July 30, 2016 5:18 pm
Hi, I observed and photographed a Green Heron capture what I think might be a dragonfly naiad or some other aquatic nymph today at Huntley Meadows in Alexandria, Virginia. I wouldn’t expect a species ID, but do you think this is even an insect? I can’t think of another possibility…. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Dear Seth,
What marvelous images you have submitted.  This larva appears to be a Water Tiger, the predatory, aquatic larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the genus
Dytiscus.  This posting is a marvelous addition to our Food Chain tag.

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Green Heron Eats Water Tiger

Subject: Beetle
Location: Northeast Ohio, Youngstown
July 30, 2016 5:33 pm
Found this bug in my kitchen… It’s 8:30 PM EST in northeast Ohio on July 30,2016. It’s about 75 degrees Fahrenheit, and we’ve been having some unusually warm and humid weather. Just wondered what this little guy is. 🙂
Signature: Mindy

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Dear Mindy,
This is an Ailanthus Webworm Moth, a species with caterpillars that feed on the leaves of the invasive Ailanthus Tree or Tree of Heaven.  On a totally different note, did you go to see Hillary Clinton speak at East High School today?  We have relatives in the Youngstown area, including mom who is 87 and lives in Campbell, Ohio, where our editorial staff was born and raised.  We have also been closely following the Mill Creek Park drama, and we personally feel it is very unfortunate when we hear how mismanagement has resulted in controversial and unfair job terminations there, and how the park is falling into a very sad state due to lack of proper staffing.

Subject: One very strange bug….
Location: North of Seattle, Wa
July 30, 2016 4:10 pm
My cat was staring at this bug that got inside and first I thought it was a wasp so I picked it up and tossed it in the toilet and it started skeeting around
on the water so I took the below photos. I have no Idea what it is. Can you help?
I picked it up and put it outside
Can you help???
Signature: Don Everest

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Don,
This Black and Yellow Mud Dauber,
Sceliphron caementarium, actually is a wasp, and we are curious how you “picked it up and put it outside.”  The Black and Yellow Mud Dauber is a solitary wasp, and it is not an aggressive species, however, females are able to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults nectar at flowers; mud nests are built in all kinds of sheltered locations, incl. man-made structures, rock ledges, etc. Adults collect mud for nests at puddle/pool edges” and “nests are provisioned with spiders; adults common at flowers(3), especially parsnip and water parsnip, and visit hummingbird feeders.”  Because you took pity on this Black and Yellow Mud Dauber, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Subject: Classy black beetle with orange dot. Not a lady bug.
Location: Troy, VA
July 30, 2016 12:45 pm
I saw this beetle last night and I think he is terribly elegant. I’m very curious as to what it is, I can’t find beetles like it with one orange dot. He does, alas, seem to be missing at least one leg.
thank you
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Polyphore Fungus Beetle:  Penthe obliquata

Polyphore Fungus Beetle: Penthe obliquata

Dear Grace,
This is a Polyphore Fungus Beetle in the family Tetratomidae,
Penthe obliquata, and we identified it in Arthur E. Evans wonderful book “Beetles of Eastern North America”.

Subject: Butterfly
Location: philippines
July 27, 2016 12:18 am
May i ask the Family/Genus of this butterfly if that is ok;) coz i like to collect pupa of butterflies and excited to see what it looks like as it emerge…thanks…
Signature: karyl

Common Jay Chrysalis

Common Jay Chrysalis

Dear Karyl,
This butterfly is in the family Papilionidae a group that includes swallowtails, birdwings and Apollos.  We believe we have correctly identified your butterfly as a Common Jay,
Arisbe doson gyndes, thanks to images posted to the Philippine Lepidoptera site.  Insect Designs also has a nice image. 

Common Jay

Common Jay

thank you so much for the identification;)

Common Jay ventral surface

Common Jay ventral surface

Subject: Newly hatched Cicada
Location: Salisbury, NC
July 29, 2016 12:21 pm
Took this photo a few years ago, still one of my favorites. Thought you’d enjoy seeing it.
Signature: Heidi C.

Brood XIX Periodical Cicada

Brood XIX Periodical Cicada

Dear Heidi,
According to the file data, this image was taken on May 9, 2011 at 11:50 AM.  That makes this Periodical Cicada a member of Brood XIX, or the Great Southern Brood, according to USA Today.  This brood has a 13 year cycle, as opposed to the 17 year cycle of more northern broods.  Also, it appears that the lower creature in your image is a nymph that has not yet molted, and not an empty exuvia.  Earlier this year, we sent out a request for images of Brood V Periodical Cicadas, but alas, none were submitted.