What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grapevine Beetle
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
July 25, 2016 2:44 pm
Unusual find for our location, and we have no grapevines nearby. Beautiful beetle.
Signature: Derek

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Dear Derek,
You are correct that this is a Grapevine Beetle, and according to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on grape (Vitis) foliage and fruit, both wild and cultivated species. Not a serious pest. Larvae host on dead
Acer, Celtis, Juglans, Malus, Platanus, Quercus, Ulmus spp.”  Though we don’t want to take the time to research all genera of larval hosts, they include maple, walnut, oak and elm and we are relatively certain some of those trees are found nearby.  Also, the adult plant host list might be incomplete.  Folks who want to start butterfly gardens quickly learn that if they do not have caterpillar host plants to produce the butterflies, they will not have many visitors to the flowers they plant.

Grapevine Beetle (image lightened)

Grapevine Beetle (image lightened)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

4 Responses to Grapevine Beetle

  1. Gene St. Denis says:

    Very nice solid scarab ! It has been noted in north America ,that many species are now moving north ( slowly ) as the massive warming tread is increasing world wide . We all will have to monitor these range extensions , as they represent important and drastic environmental changes for everything plant and animal on our continent . Cheers ! Gene St. Denis Sierra Nevada Research

    • bugman says:

      Hi Gene,
      We suspect you mean “without spots” when you wrote “solid scarab” so we lightened the image and reposted as the spots were hidden in the shadows. WTB? has been reporting Grapevine Beetles from Canada as far back as 2006. Citizen Science programs that report wildlife sightings have increased in popularity lately, and they are a great documentation of range expansion. WTB? has much in common with Citizen Science programs, but alas, our records are not very well organized. We remember the thrill we felt when we first reported neotropical Green Orchid Bees in Florida back in 2004.

  2. Gene St. Denis says:

    Daniel, I meant that physically the specimen was solid / healthy and not crushed ( they are Beautiful Scarabs ! ) . Folks up north are seeing more and more insects, birds, and mammals that have not been in their area before , as they were south of them ( the plants will follow) . The dreaded words….. Global Warming …… is starting to have hard evidence , whether we want it or not . Cheers! Geno

    • bugman says:

      Thanks for the clarification Gene. Habitats are changing everywhere for so many reasons, though we humans seem connected to almost all of it.

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