From the daily archives: "Monday, July 11, 2016"

Subject: What specie of Beetle is this?
Location: Work yard
July 10, 2016 3:51 pm
Dear, Bugman
I was at work wen i noticed this big bug t first i thought it was a hornet but it till i relised it was a lot bigger that i wassnt so i took a snap of the bug and it looks to be a beetle if this is a bettle what type of beetle is this as i am from the uk and i never thought we had any.
Signature: Yours faithly Tiarone Trimmer

Stag Beetle

Stag Beetle

Where is the work yard?  Zimbabwe?  Belize??  Other???

Ed. Note:  The location field in our standard form is meant to give us a general indication of where in the world the sighting occurred.  Locations like “bathroom” or “work yard” are not very helpful.  As most of our identification requests from May through October come from North America, we suspect this is case with this Stag Beetle, which we identified to the family level because of the shape of the antennae, which is illustrated on the BugGuide site.  Most of the head is obscured by what appears to be a spider web.  Though Tiarone has indicated “i am from the uk” there is no indication that the sighting occurred there.  If this is a North American sighting, it might be Lucanus placidus which is pictured on BugGuide.

 

Subject: Gray bug came out of water
Location: Cumberland county nj
July 11, 2016 3:47 am
My husband had his feet in the river and this grayish bug climbed onto his leg, not sure if it fell in the river and was trying to get out or if it lives in water. Can’t find this bug in any of the books I have or on the internet
Signature: Anyway

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Anyway,
This is the aquatic larva of Naiad of a Dragonfly.  Dragonfly larvae are aquatic predators and when they are nearing maturity, they climb up onto plants growing out of the water, dock pylons or other vertical surfaces protruding from the water so that they can molt and emerge as winged adults.  Your husbands leg presented the perfect surface to accomplish this metamorphosis.  Your Naiad looks like the images on TroutNut that are identified as being in the family Gomphidae.  According to BugGuide, members of the family Gomphidae are known as Clubtails. 

Subject: Bug in pool
Location: Southern Ontario
July 11, 2016 6:49 am
Hello Bugman!
This bug was in our pool for over a day. My daughter caught it in a jar so we could look at it better, and get it out of our pool! It looks like it has a long skinny stinger at the back It’s summertime here. Thanks so much!
Signature: Gretchen

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Gretchen,
This is a Water Scorpion, an aquatic predator whose common name refers to the painful bite that might result if it is carelessly handled or accidentally encountered while swimming or wading.  Water Scorpions are capable of flying from one body of water to another.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually a breathing tube.  This description of a Water Scorpion comes from the Northern State University website:  “Water scorpions are not really scorpions, but insects with only 3 pairs of legs and 2 pairs of wings. Their name comes from their specialized grasping forelimbs, superficially similar to the anterior ‘pincers’ of scorpions, and an elongate caudal siphon or breathing tube, which conjures up the image of the scorpion’s long stinging tail. In both cases, these features are completely different from their scorpion counterparts. The forelegs of a true scorpion have a powerful pincer – similar to that of a crab or lobster – at the tip. The forelegs of the water scorpions are likewise adapted for grasping prey, but lack pincers; instead, they use a jack-knifing design with the outer segments folding into a groove to secure prey. The tail of a scorpion has 6 rounded segments with a terminal venomous spine, and can be folded forward over the animal’s back. The tail siphon of the water scorpions is actually two straight filaments pressed against one another; the siphon is not jointed, can pivot only at the base, and does not sting. It is used to obtain air from the water surface, much like a snorkel.”

Subject: What type of bug is this?
Location: South Africa
July 10, 2016 10:46 am
Please can you identify what bug this is?
Kind regards
Signature: Cherise Walker

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Cherise,
This is a Bristle Fly or Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, a group of parasitoid species that prey upon a variety of creatures.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally.”  This individual on iSpot looks similar to your individual.