From the daily archives: "Monday, July 11, 2016"

Subject: Really
Location: Dyersburg Tennessee
July 11, 2016 4:18 pm
Hi my mom found this bug and thinks it’s rare bug..she nor anyone she has shown knows what it is and can’t find another like it online..please help
Signature: Jodi from chicago

Leaf Footed Bug Nymph

Leaf Footed Bug Nymph

Dear Jodi,
This is an immature bug, and available identification images are generally of the adults, so let mom and friends know why they had so much difficulty.  We believe this Leaf-Footed Bug nymph is in the genus
Acanthocephala, probably Acanthocephala terminalis based on the range according to BugGuide sightings.

Subject: Butterfly Alaska
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
July 11, 2016 1:08 pm
My daughter and I found this butterfly floating through our backyard. I think they are attracted to all of our flowers and flowering trees and shrubs. I also think they like some of the water than gets sprayed all over the yard by my toddler. I love butterflies and usually only see the yellow swallowtails. I’ve never seen one like this before. (Taken in Anchorage ,Alaska May 2016)
Signature: MsRobin

Mourning Cloak

Mourning Cloak

Dear MsRobin,
This lovely butterfly is a Mourning Cloak, and we doubt it is attracted to the flowers in your yard.  Mourning Cloaks are more unusual in their dietary preferences.  They prefer rotting fruit and sap oozing from trees to nectar derived from blossoms.  Mourning Cloaks are also among the most long lived butterflies because those that mature toward the end of summer will hibernate as adults.  They are known to fly about on sunny winter days while there is still snow on the ground to search for tree sap.  We would love to have you submit images of your Alaskan Swallowtails as well.

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Mount Pleasant, NC
July 11, 2016 6:47 am
I was in my home and sat back in a chair when this little guy bit/stung me.
Signature: Kathrine E Morales

Masked Hunter Unmasked

Masked Hunter Unmasked

Dear Kathrine,
This is a Masked Hunter, a species of Assassin Bug that has a sticky exoskeleton that causes dust and debris to adhere to the insect, creating an effective camouflage by masking it to match its surroundings.  Your individual is probably freshly molted and it still needs to be “masked” and here is a matching image from our archives of an unmasked Masked Hunter.  Though reportedly painful, the bite is not serious.  Masked Hunters are predators that will help eliminate many unwanted Household Pests.

Subject: Crab Be USAetle/Pseudoscorpion?
Location: Roswell, Georgia USA
July 11, 2016 7:32 am
Hi! This little guy was on my patio yesterday. I saw one other just like it years ago. I can’t quite find it in all the images around. I thought maybe a pseudoscorpion but this guy was well over an inch big. I’m really curious what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Paula Farbolin

Giant Stag Beetle

Giant Stag Beetle

Dear Paula,
This beauty is a male Giant Stag Beetle.  They are attracted to lights.

Wow.  Thanks!  How can you tell it’s a male?  (Yes, I realize I am opening the door to some mischief here).

Males have the impressive, mandibles that resemble a stag’s antlers.  Females, like this individual posted to BugGuide, lack the oversized mandibles.

Subject: Never seen this before
Location: Lancaster County
July 11, 2016 8:17 am
Found this on my flag this morning. Have never seen this before? Please enlighten.
Signature: James DeBord

Wood Leopard Moth

Wood Leopard Moth

Dear James,
Where is Lancaster County?  If you are in UK, this is a native species.  If you are in Pennsylvania or North Carolina, this is an introduced species.  It is a Wood Leopard Moth,
Zeuzera pyrina, and according to BugGuide:  “Supposedly introduced (from its native Europe?) in mid-1800s; first reported in North America at Hoboken, New Jersey in 1882.  It is considered a pest of some fruit trees.” 

Yes sorry, I didn’t specify. Pennsylvania. Thanks for the info. I have never seen one before in all my years in PA.

Subject: what kind of beetle is this?
Location: Vancouver wa
July 11, 2016 7:42 am
Hello, I was wondering if you could help me with the identification of this beetle….. my wife, son and I where in a walk the other day in a field at the Vancouver wa. Wild life refuge. I was looking at a cluster of flowers (image 1) when I seen a couple of little black bugs crawling threw it. I flipped it over and found two little orangish beetles that where mating (image 2-3) I’ve never seen these little guys before and can not seem to find them on Google or any of the other sites I use for identification.
Signature: Thank you for your time, James Roberson

Mating Hogweed Bonking Beetles

Mating Hogweed Bonking Beetles

Dear James,
These mating Soldier Beetles are living up to their name Hogweed Bonking Beetles.  They are an introduced species from Eurasia and they are predators.  The dark tips of the wings are an identifying feature.

Lol, yeah I’d defiantly say that they are… Thank you for your help and quick response. I have found your site very useful many times and this is another good example.