From the daily archives: "Sunday, July 10, 2016"

Subject:  Walnut Underwing flashes its colors in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 10, 2016 10:30 PM
Though we have managed to get images of Walnut Underwings several times each year, getting a good glimpse at the gorgeously marked underwings responsible for the common name is not that easy.  This beauty was quite cooperative tonight.  After startling it when we walked out onto the porch to dump a pot full of water into the garden, it remained “posing” on the ground until we had time to run for the camera and we got a few images using the on-camera flash.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Subject: Shiny beetle found in my garden
Location: Galveston county, Texas
July 10, 2016 2:34 pm
I was watering my garden and this bug came out of the mud/dirt. It reminds me of a Japanese beetle and a grasshopper mixed together. I’ve seen two of the same kind of bug very close to my tomatoes and in no other part of my garden. Both times it was about mid-day (summer time) near Galveston, Tx. I just want to know what it is and if it’s bad.
Signature: All my thanks, Morgan

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Dear Morgan,
Not only is it beautiful, this Tiger Beetle is a beneficial predator that will help control the number of insects in your garden naturally.  We believe we have correctly identified this beauty as a Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle or Carolina Metallic Tiger Beetle,
Tetracha carolina, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day.”  We hope you will tolerate this gorgeous predator in the future, but for now we have to tag your submission as Unnecessary Carnage.

Subject: Massachusetts Trapdoor Spider?
Location: South Central Massachusetts
July 10, 2016 11:00 am
I would be most appreciative if you could identify the spider I found last week walking on my garage floor. I have never seen this particular spider before. Could it be a northeast trapdoor spider? I let him go without harm, I love spiders.
Signature: Thank you!

Trapdoor Spider

Black Purseweb Spider

Though this might be a Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia, based on images posted to BugGuide,  the genus seems to be primarily a southern genus with sightings as far north as Maryland on BugGuide.  We believe a much closer match is a Purseweb Spider in the family Atypidae, like this individual posted to BugGuide.  The Black Purseweb Spider, Sphodros niger, pictured on BugGuide looks like a perfect match to us and you are well within the documented range of the species according to BugGuide.  The spinnerets, the silk producing organs at the tip of the abdomen, are quite distinctive, as are the impressive chelicerae.  You may enjoy the information provided in the Angelfire pdf.

Subject: What is This Little Guy?
Location: South Western Wisconsin
July 10, 2016 8:25 am
Hello!
I found this bug on my door handle outside of my home. I’ve yet to find out what kind of bug it is and I’m very curious as I have never seen such a weird looking insect.
Thank you for you time!
Signature: Sincerely, Alli J.

Litter Moth

Litter Moth

Dear Alli J.,
The first time we received an image of such a long legged moth, we were totally stumped until a reader wrote in that it was a Litter Moth in the genus
Palthis.  Interestingly, though there a many images for the genus on BugGuide, very few show the front legs extended, and this BugGuide image is the closest we can find that looks like your individual.  Moth Photographers Group also has images, but none show the legs extended as in your image.

Subject: Several IDs please
Location: Mason Co. Michigan
July 9, 2016 7:25 pm
Good evening,
I’ve attached three photos which i would like help with. The first, I think is an an mimic spider and would like to know what kind. The second, I think is a long-horn beetle but can not find specific information. And third, I found a pair of unusual insect “egg nests” (for lack of better term). If you can shed some light on what these are I’d appreciate it. Both were found on Lilac leaves.
Thank you!
John R. Poindexter
Signature: John

Flower Longhorn: Leptura subhamata

Flower Longhorn: Leptura subhamata

Dear John,
As it stands, your request has three very different “creatures” you would like identified:  a spider, a beetle and a cluster of eggs.  To keep our classifications on our site from being too confusing, we limit our postings to a single species, or at least a single classification category.  With that stated, your Longhorn  appears to be
Leptura subhamata, which we identified on BugGuide, where it states:  “larvae host in decomposing Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and pine species (Pinus).”  If you still want additional information on your Spider and Eggs, please resubmit distinct new requests limiting your submission to a single species.

Daniel,
Thank you for your quick response and information on the beetle. My apologies for “clumping” my requests. I will resubmit for the spider. However, a friend (utilizing your site) identified the egg nest for me as that of a wheel bug.
Again, thank you for you quick help.
Regards, John

Subject: What type of bug is this? I found it in my garden in North Dakota
Location: Bismarck, North Dakota
July 9, 2016 9:56 pm
I found this bug in a type of lily leaf, I believe! I haven’t found a picture of any bug that looks like this, what is it??
Signature: Tammy Hutchinson

Milkweed Longhorn:  Tetraopes annulatus

Milkweed Longhorn: Tetraopes annulatus

Dear Tammy,
Are you growing Milkweed in your garden?  This is a Milkweed Longhorn in the genus
Tetraopes, and we believe we have correctly identified it as Tetraopes annulatus on BugGuide. where the host plants are listed as “A. sullivantii, A. subverticillata, A. speciosa.”  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “Adults feed on leaves of milkweed (Asclepias); larvae feed externally on roots of host (root feeding is unique among Lamiinae). Each species (or subspecies) is associated with one or a few host species (an example of coevolution).”  North Dakota is listed on BugGuide as one of the states where sightings of this species have been reported, indicating that at least one species of Milkweed that is the specific host plant for this Milkweed Longhorn is native to North Dakota.