From the daily archives: "Friday, July 8, 2016"

Subject: Safe or not?
Location: North east USA, Pennsylvania
July 8, 2016 2:48 pm
I occasionally find these in my kitchen they kind of jump and I believe they have wings like ladybugs but I haven’t seen them fly just jump…
Signature: Concerned Mama

Northern Plantain Flea Beetle

Northern Plantain Flea Beetle

Dear Concerned Mama,
Thank you for including a pack of Newport cigarettes for scale, and in our opinion, that pack poses a far greater health threat to all involved than this Flea Beetle does.  We believe we have correctly identified it on BugGuide as the Northern Plantain Flea Beetle,
Dibolia borealis, and based on the size relationship to the pack of cigarettes, the stated 3mm size seems about correct.  According to BugGuide, they feed on:  “Plantago spp. (Plantaginaceae)” and “Larvae are leaf miners of plantains. ”  According to The Herbal Encyclopedia:  “The plant is indigenous to the Mediterranean region and western Asia; but it now grows worldwide … .  To many areas, it is considered a weed.  The herb is an annual that grows to about sixteen inches in height, producing narrow leaves and clusters of tiny whitish-brown flowers.”  Plantain grows in many fields and open areas in the eastern part of North America.  Perhaps you have some plantain near your kitchen which is causing the Flea Beetles to accidentally enter your home.   

Subject: What kind of bug is this?!
Location: North Texas
July 8, 2016 2:23 pm
Dear Bugman,
My son and I stumbled across this sucker while at a house viewing. It is fairly large, perhaps an inch and a half to two inches long with very large antennae. It is a pale yellow and black and was very active. Thanks for any help given, my kid was pretty excited about it.
Brian
Signature: Brian

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Dear Brian,
This beautiful beetle is a Cottonwood Borer,
Plectrodera scalator.  According to the Great Plains Nature Center:  “The bold coloration of the cottonwood borer is due not to colors in the exoskeleton, but rather to masses of small white hairs, which are only visible with magnification.”

Daniel,
Thanks so much for the quick response! Have a great weekend.

 

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Mozambique
July 7, 2016 9:42 pm
Big man,
I was in Mozambique Africa June 10-15 this year and saw this bug. It was about 1/2 an inch long maybe more. We were driving from Tofo to Beliene and stopped on the side of the road. I thought it looked interesting and took a picture. Do you know what it might be?
Signature: – Liz

Red Bug nymph

Red Bug nymph

Dear Liz,
Our suspicion that this is an immature Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae was confirmed when we located this matching image on iNaturalist, but alas, it is not identified to the species level.

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: Columbia, SC
July 8, 2016 8:59 am
I found this (see picture) on my front door frame, near my potted herbs. Can you help me identify it? Perhaps give me the latin name so i can read up about it.
Signature: OJ

Assassin Bug:  Zelus luridus

Pale Green Assassin Bug: Zelus luridus

Dear OJ,
We believe we have correctly identified your beneficial, predatory Pale Green Assassin Bug as
Zelus luridus thanks to this BugGuide image.

Subject: What is this bee looking bug?
Location: New York, 10960
July 8, 2016 10:07 am
I know there are carpenter bees eating away at my deck. But the other day I saw this guy just lurking around. It doesn’t look like the others. The thorax is much longer than the C-bees. And the black circle, by where the wings attach to the body, surrounded by the gold fuzz is much much larger.
Image 1 is the bug in question
Image 2 is the carpenter bee
Thank you!
Signature: Deena

Sculptured Resin Bee

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear Deena,
The Bee in question is an introduced Sculptured Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and according to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”  Thanks for including the image of the Eastern Carpenter Bee for comparison.

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Subject: Uknown bug pupa/nymph
Location: South-eastern europe/Serbia
July 7, 2016 6:41 am
I found this bug pupa/nymph buried under ground in a group of four. They are filled with some white, almost milk like fluid and are found few inches below ground. It looks familiar to me, but I am not sure what it actually is, so I’m want to know is this bug dangerous and can it do any damage to the crops in the garden.
Signature: MD

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Dear MD,
We are very confident that this is the Pupa of a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae and our first thought is that it must be the Pupa of a Cockchafer since that is the most common European Scarab Beetle submitted to our site, however, based on this image posted to the Gardening & Landscaping Stack Exchange and this image posted to the HYPP Zoology page, after clicking the link, we believe you have a different species.  According to Research Gate:  “A total of 178 species, 83 genera, 15 tribes, and 7 subfamilies of the family Scarabaeidae are recorded from Serbia.”  This image of a pupa of a female European Rhinoceros Beetle,
Oryctes nasicornis ondrejanus, from BioLib looks much closer.  

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa

Scarab Beetle Pupa