From the daily archives: "Thursday, July 7, 2016"

Subject: Colorado bug
Location: Longmont, CO
July 6, 2016 3:35 pm
Found this bug in my shirt collar. Yuck!
Signature: Matt

Jewel Beetle: Buprestis confluenta

Jewel Beetle: Buprestis confluenta

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your Jewel Beetle on BugGuide as
Buprestis confluenta.  Your Jewel Beetle appeared right on schedule because according to BugGuide, they appear:  “Primarily July (per pix posted here).”  According to Beetles in the Bush:  “B. confluenta is downright stunning! Brilliant green, perhaps with a slight coppery brown to purplish blue hue and with more or less confluent (thus the species name) fine yellow flecks densely scattered over the elytra, it is one of the easiest to identify of any species in the genus.”  We somehow feel your “Yuck!” comment is a tad bit harsh.

Subject: Beautiful Aqua Teeny Guy!
Location: Gladwin, Michigan
July 6, 2016 5:36 pm
This intriguing little thing found its way onto my hand while visiting family in Michigan this 4th of July weekend. Very small, very active. The only aqua colored insects I could find online were weevils and this guy didn’t have a weevil face. I tried to get a closer shot but this was as clear as I could get. It was a sunny day, approx 79-82 degrees with low humidity near Lake Lancer in Gladwin, MI (mid-Michigan, lower peninsula). Thank you for your beautiful website ?
Signature: Bugs are beautiful

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Your insect is in fact a Weevil, which is a classification of Beetles.  It is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil, Polydrusus formosus, which is represented on BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread.”

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Thank you so much!  What a pretty little thing.  I hate that it’s an invasive introduced species.  Your website is just wonderful, thank you for your love for the little guys!

Subject: Jewel Bug?
Location: Powell River, B.C. Canada
July 6, 2016 6:30 pm
The sunlight reflecting off this small little bug is what got my attention. I tried to get a picture before it flew away…the original photo being about 3 feet away. I’ve never seen this kind of bug before, and posted the picture on social media in an attempt to identify it. The only answers I got was that it was a June Bug, which I disagreed. Through your wonderful site, i narrowed it down to a Jewel Bug, or a Golden Flatheaded borer. Any final clarification would be great, but I would also enjoy sharing this picture with others if it is of a quality good enough for you to use.
Signature: Yvonne Kelshaw

Golden Buprestid

Golden Buprestid

Dear Yvonne,
Your self-identification is basically correct, but we would like to make a few clarifications.  This is a Golden Buprestid,
Buprestis aurulenta.  The members of the family Buprestidae are sometimes called Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles.  Jewel Bug is a common name for a Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae.

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Central New Jersey
July 7, 2016 4:11 am
I have a number of bugs that seem localized to my kitchen, almost all I’ve seen on the floor, only a couple on the walls. They are very small, do not apear winged but seem to be able to jump. They are not on my 2 dogs. I cannot find a concentration of them in any one spot. They are not in my cabinets, I don’t see any in the crawlspace beneath the kitchen or I’m the adjacent garage or dining room. Please help?
Signature: Chris

Springtail

Springtail

Dear Chris,
This is a benign Elongate Bodied Springtail, and though they are not considered harmful, and are in fact considered beneficial, they can be a nuisance if too plentiful.

Thank you Daniel after a little research I discovered the same thing after I emailed you but definitely good to get a confirmation from an expert, I really appreciate it. Now I just have to figure out how to get them out of my house.

Subject: Unidentifiable fly
Location: Republic of Congo (Odzala NP)
July 7, 2016 1:42 am
For almost a year now I have been trying to identify this fly. Still, I have not found what species it is. My guess is that it belongs to the Ulidiidae, but I am not sure. Does anyone have an idea what species this fly could be? I photographed it in the Republic of the Congo
Signature: Daniel Nelson

Possibly Picture Winged Fly

Possibly Picture Winged Fly

Dear Daniel,
We agree that this could be a Picture Winged Fly in the family Ulidiidae, but we would seriously consider expanding the possibilities to include the superfamily Tephritoidea that includes Ulidiidae.  The perspective of your image, while quite artful, is not ideal for identification purposes if considered alone.  We once recall reading that four different views are helpful in identifying Robber Flies:  dorsal, lateral, head showing eyes and one other view that currently escapes our memory.  Alas, we cannot locate where we read that.  Furthermore, while quite pretty, many small flies do not command the same attention as large and showy butterflies, moths and beetles that are all much better represented on the internet.  Species from Africa are far less well documented on the internet than North American, Australian and British species.  We feel if you are only depending upon the internet, exact species identification based on this single image might not be possible.  With all that stated, we are posting your gorgeous image and we appeal to our readership to provide comments with any suggestions they may have.

Subject: Large moth
Location: Saskatoon, sk
July 6, 2016 8:09 pm
This guy fell out of our tree in our yard, he was not alive when i seen him fall and because he is so large from other moths in our area I am curious to find out what kind he is.
Signature: Cara

Waved Sphinx

Waved Sphinx

Dear Cara,
This appears to us to be a Waved Sphinx.  You may read more about the Waved Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.