What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Silkmoth Caterpillar (Thank to you!)
Location: State of Mexico, Mexico
July 5, 2016 12:29 am
Hi, last October I wrote asking for help to identify some 4-really big caterpillars (Rothschildia spp.). But because they we’re very exposed (at neighborhood tree) I decided to remove them and place them in my own tree. Do not worry, both are Ligustrum spp.
Once the pupae were OK, I removed them and kept them equipped for survival. Then, eight months after (July 16 & 17) the first two butterflies were born. Something really wonderful to see. Up to eight males came to fertilize the first female (I’m on the city). They measure 15x7cm, and one of them left some eggs before going away, now caterpillars
The remaining two pupae remain safe, but no butterflies yet. They are solid, heavy and safe. I understand that Rothschildia are sometimes difficult to identify, but you know. It may be useful a bit. Thank you.
October’s post:
2015/10/13/silkmoth-caterpillar-from-mexico-rothschildia-species/
Signature: Alfredo Perez

Rothschildia species

Rothschildia species

Dear Alfredo,
Thanks so much for following up on the progress of your Rothschildia caterpillars.  Back in October, Bill Oehlke provided this tentative identification:  “I think it is more likely
Rothschilida orizaba orizaba or Rothschildia peggyae, based on location. … Many of the Rothschildia adults and larvae are quite similar.”  We will contact Bill Oehlke again to see if he can identify the adults more specifically.  We understand that in Spanish, the term Mariposa can be used for both butterflies and moths, but in English there is a distinction.  Your adult Rothschildias are Moths, not Butterflies.

Rothschildia species

Rothschildia species

Rothschildia Caterpillar Hatchlings

Rothschildia Caterpillar Hatchlings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Mexico, Mexico

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