From the monthly archives: "June 2016"

Subject: Fly??
Location: Darlington
June 28, 2016 7:05 am
Can you tell me what this is please? I had one in my bathroom which I flushed down plug hole then just found this one 2 days later crawling up door frame on the landing. It looks like it has wings but I didn’t see it fly, it was crawling both times. Not sure if it’s the same one which survived plug hole or of its another?? Don’t even know if it’s a fly but it only has 6 legs
Signature: Sandra

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Sandra,
Please confirm that your location is Darlington, South Carolina.  We needed to do a web search to determine the location of the city Darlington, but we cannot say for certain that there is no city by that name in England.  This is a blood sucking Louse Fly.  They have warm blooded hosts.  Some feed on the blood of livestock, some on the blood of deer and some on the blood of birds.  They are opportunistic and they will feed off of human blood if there is no animal host available.

Hi thanks for your reply. I am in Darlington County Durham, U.K.  Is it likely that I will have more in my house?
Regards
Sandra

Thanks for the clarification Sandra.  If this is a species that preys on livestock and you are near livestock, you may get more.  If it is a species that preys upon deer and you are near a woods with deer, you may get more.  If this is a species that preys upon birds and you have a bird nest in your eaves, you may get more.

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: NorthWest Ontario
June 27, 2016 8:14 pm
This tree fell down in a recent storm and is known as a Manitoba Maple. This photo is taken of two of the several black yellow winged dragonfly scorpion like taled flyer. Behaviour of which is interesting and peculiar caught the eyes of many… They appeared to be mating or birthing or fertilizing… Hard to say if the tentacles at the end of their tales were their own or coming out…or if the green thick fluid like stuff was a placenta or mating fluids or ? Very bizarre as they seemed to be labouring if not pleasuring. One I thought was birthing actually burrowed it’s once widened tail tip into a hole in the bark made by termites….nestled it there and rested. A couple of these bugs looked rather fresh, young, and of the brighter yellow and reddish brown, one somewhat curled up and drying off …I wondered if was born recently. A couple of the bugs were blacker than others, almost all black and their tails so black you would hardly notice them in the shadows of the tree pieces or against the earth.
I live in northwestern Ontario bordering with Manitoba. We just had a lot of rain, 44mm this past weekend.
What is this bug
Signature: Curious C

Two Giant Ichneumons Oviposit

Two Giant Ichneumons Oviposit

Dear Curious C,
In your image, you have captured two different species of female Giant Ichneumons in the genus
Megarhyssa, sometimes called Stump Stabbers, and each is in the process of laying eggs or ovipositing.  Giant Ichneumons are parasitoid wasps and their host insects are the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps in the subfamily Tremecinae, including the Pigeon Horntail, that feed on the wood of deciduous trees.  The smaller brown and yellow individual is Megarhyssa macrurus, and the larger, black and yellow individual is Megarhyssa atrata.

Wow! Very informative and fast ID’ing!! Thankyou so much!!:)
Curious C 😉

Subject: Bug invasion!
Location: Los Altos CA
June 27, 2016 5:42 pm
Hi bugman! I’m having a bit of a freak out here in Northern California (Los Altos), and hope you can help. There has been a sudden appearance of a large number of tiny black and tan bugs at my house. They seem to come from the foundation of the stucco house and swarm the walls and windows, and stream in through cracks in doors and windows! They show up in the late afternoon when it gets warm, and there are thousands and thousands of them, and then they disappear as it cools down in the evening. They don’t seem to fly, rather scurry along very quickly and seem to fall down from the wall if scared. They appear en masse on one wall one day and then will be greatly diminished in a day, but then appear along another wall a day or two later. We have had a drought here, so the ground is not damp, and they don’t look like the pictures of fungus-eating springtails I saw online. What could they be and what should I do to stop the invasion? Thank you so much for any guidance!
Signature: Disturbed by the force

Oh, I forgot to tell you about the size…they are tiny! Some are small like the size of a flea, and some are barely visible like the size of pepper. They also don’t fly, and don’t seem to bite, although I haven’t really given them a chance to try.
Thank you again!

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Dear Disturbed by the force,
Your insects look identical to the ones in this two year old posting from Northern California that we identified as potentially Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae. 

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for your help! Still quite disturbing to see those tiny dirt-colored seed bugs everywhere, but I am so glad to know what they are. I can now research them by name and see the best way to get rid of them.
Thank you again,
Elise

Subject: Mud Dauber?
Location: Eakin Park, Fairfax, Virginia
June 28, 2016 6:14 am
Hi – I photographed this wasp yesterday, and after a good bit of searching, the closest match I can find is the Black and Yellow Mud Dauber, except this wasp has yellow, not black antennae. (It was clinging to some grass, and seemed to not be doing well, as it was barely moving.) Perhaps you can help with the ID? Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Therion morio

Therion morio

Dear Seth,
This is a parasitoid Ichneumon Wasp,
Therion morio, and according to BugGuide, the host insect is:  “moth larvae, including Hyphantria cunea (Fall Webworm).”

Subject: Can’t Identify
Location: Montrose, Pennsylvania
June 27, 2016 10:46 am
Hi! I live in a rural, farm rich area of Northeastern Pennsylvania. I found this flying insect on my deck steps. At first, I thought it was dead but after a few pictures, it flew away. I’ve never seen one before & couldn’t find an exact match to identify it. Would you happen to know what it is? P.S., this was found on a rainy, warm June day when the farmers next door were bailing hay~ Thank you!
Signature: Amy M. Newhart

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Amy,
This is a Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and while we are not certain of the species, it does appear as though it might be
Platydracus maculosus based on this BugGuide image.

Subject: What is this
Location: overland park, kansas
June 27, 2016 2:08 pm
I saw this speck of fluff the outer day, blowing around. Realized it wasn’t fluff, but a flying creature. Can you identify it?
Signature: Ellen Zipf

Woolly Aphid

Woolly Aphid

Dear Ellen,
Many folks liken the appearance of Woolly Aphids to Angels or Fairies.