From the monthly archives: "May 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of fly?
Location: Lexington, MA
May 26, 2016 5:22 am
I live in Eastern Massachusetts and noticed these flying insects swarming all over our backyard. They don’t seem to bother humans but they really seem to like the grass seed on our overgrown grass. Can you please tell me what they are?
Signature: Gordon

March Flies

March Flies

Dear Gordon,
These are mating, sexually dimorphic March Flies in the family Bibionidae.  Males March Flies can be distinguished from females by their larger heads and bigger eyes.  We suspect because of your location they are most likely 
Bibio albipennis based on BugGuide information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar?
Location: Upstate New York
May 26, 2016 5:44 am
We found this under a tree. He is about 2 inches long. His underbelly is green with black spots. There are 2 black ‘spikes’ near his rear end. It is almost June here in Albany, NY.
Signature: Abbie Donnelly

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Abbie,
We believe based on your image and descriptions that this is one of the Underwing Caterpillars in the genus
Catocala, but we are unable to provide you with an exact species.  You may browse through BugGuide to see some similar looking Caterpillars.  Here is a BugGuide image showing a green underside with black spots.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug ID
Location: SW Washington, Pacific County
May 26, 2016 1:57 am
These bugs showed up in our area last year for the first time. It has been suggested that they are box elder bugs, but they do not look like photos of box elder bugs. Can you help ID them?
Signature: valleygirl

Mating Bordered Plant Bugs

Mating Bordered Plant Bugs

Dear valleygirl,
These are Bordered Plant Bugs in the genus
Largus, and considering your location, we are relatively confident they are Largus cinctus, a west coast species.  You may refer to BugGuide for additional images of Bordered Plant Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the … Is this?
Location: Maryland USA
May 24, 2016 7:54 pm
I’ve seen wasps and crane flies. This seems to be closer to a wasp. When I tried to be sparing and set it free it attempted to sting me numerous times while not being able to break the skin it seems. It got back inside and brought family ( see photo 2) there does seem to be a stinger on them. I did in fact kill them both. Only get one shot in my house unless your a spider, then you get none. Anyways, do you have any idea of what this is? If you have some photo reference if greatly appreciate it. Thanks!
Signature: Chris Joy

Ichneumons

Ichneumons

Dear Chris,
We are very curious about your mini-guillotine, because we cannot fathom how you have managed to kill these two Ichneumon Wasps by removing their heads but otherwise leaving their bodies intact.  Most wasps in the family Ichneumonidae, probably the largest family on earth with the most individual species, are perfectly harmless, but members of the subfamily Ophioninae is capable of stinging.  According to BugGuide:  “Females have a very compressed abdomen and a short, very sharp ovipositor. The ovipositor can penetrate the human skin; most other ichneumons can’t ‘sting’.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Most species are crepuscular or nocturnal, some diurnal. They are known to come to lights.”  These Ichnuemons are solitary, and they did not conspire together to enter your home.  We suspect they were attracted to lights.  When folks write to us about stinging Crane Flies, we suspect they have confused them with members of this subfamily.

Dear Daniel,
I appreciate your response. That was what I suspected them to be. As far as mini guillotine, well the answer there is just an old fashion credit card and hitting them before they could fly away that simple. But thank you for answering my question I know you all are busy and I’m glad you had the time to respond.
VR
Chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Davidson County, NC
May 25, 2016 6:58 am
Hi, bugman! Can you help ID this caterpillar? I’ve looked at many pictures today and can’t find it. Thank you!
Signature: Donna

American Lady Caterpillar

American Lady Caterpillar

Dear Donna,
We had to scroll through quite a few Brush Footed Butterfly Caterpillars before we identified your American Lady Caterpillar,
Vanessa virginiensis, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Cudweeds, Everlastings and Pussytoes – Gnaphalium, Anaphalis, Antennaria.”

American Lady Caterpillar

American Lady Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bouncing spider?
Location: 90066-2724 Mar Vista CA
May 24, 2016 10:38 pm
My brother noticed this bug on a chunk of wood from the wood pile. We thought it was a spider. He didn’t dart around at all, just mostly bounce up and down. What is it?
Signature: Bouncing Bug

Thread-Legged Bug

Thread-Legged Bug

This appears to be a Thread Legged Bug, one of the predatory Assassin Bugs in the subfamily Emesinae.  You can refer to BugGuide for additional images and information on this fascinating subfamily.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination