From the monthly archives: "May 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible caddisfly?
Location: Lewis Center, OH
May 26, 2016 2:03 pm
Hi I found this guy today (May 26th 2016) on the screen door of my house. I thought it was a caddisfly, but those feathered antenna! He also looks like he has yellow fangs.
Signature: JRH

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear JRH,
This is a male Fishfly, most likely a Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, a species pictured on BugGuide where it states they are found “Near calm bodies of water with detritus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Love – American Carrion Beetle
Location: Southwest Indiana
May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Hello! I wanted to share some photos I took last summer of a pair of American Carrion Beetles with their mites. They were collected around some cat vomit…which might have had some mouse remains in it. (oh so pleasant!) Somehow the photo was forgotten until now – probably because I had embarrassment over taking bug love photos, ha ha!
Thank you for the awesome site. It’s my go-to place when I find a new bug, and I’ve never had to ask for identification – I always find what I’m looking for! We practice organic gardening on our little homestead, and I often find new creatures – so I visit your site often!
Thanks again!
Signature: Heather

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Dear Heather,
We are so thrilled to find out that you find our site so helpful.  We are also thrilled to post your images of a pair of mating American Carrion Beetles and their Phoretic Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Six -legged gray bug with orangey spots
Location: Piedmont/upstate area of South Carolina – in my yard
May 25, 2016 5:59 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am trying to learn the different garden variety bugs and which ones are beneficial and which ones need to find other living (or not) arrangements.
I don’t indiscriminately destroy any bugs; but I learned my lesson to at least contain unknown ones, even if only long enough to I.D. them.
Last year I found the coolest bug ever in my garden on my tomato plant; however, by the time I could look it up and discover what this beautiful creature was, he had already camouflaged himself! So, one huge green horned tomato worm got a reprieve from instant and permanent eviction.
The attached photo was taken in my front yard while I was trying to identify some plants and came across these guys. I still do not know what the plant is, but there were several ladybugs around too. I only saw three of these gray-orangey spotted critters. The picture of the rolled up one is the bug’s reaction to being surprised. (No gray orangey spotted critter was harmed in the making of these pics)
I hope you can help.
Signature: It’s really buggin me- Dawn

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Convergent Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Dawn,
One of the reasons you found nearby Ladybugs is that this is the larva of a Convergent Lady Beetle,
Hippodamia convergens, a species we identified on the University of Kentucky Entomology site and then verified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon “Aphids, also whiteflies and other soft bodied insects” that are considered agricultural pests, hence the Convergent Lady Beetle is available through “commercial sales for biological control.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eastern Blood Sucking Conenose?
Location: Crousetown N.S. Canada
May 25, 2016 7:08 am
I have seen a few of these around our yard and home and i was wondering what it is. It looks like a Conenose but i can’t find any information about them living in our area.
Signature: Chris

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Chris,
This harmless Western Conifer Seed Bug is frequently confused for the Eastern Blood Sucking Conenose Bug because they are both True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera.  See BugGuide to verify our identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID request for bizarre looking moth
Location: Atlanta, GA
May 27, 2016 6:55 am
Hello,
While leaving work yesterday I noticed a very unusual moth on the wall. If it were on a tree it could be easily mistaken as a mushroom. Upon further inspection it had some very beautiful coloration. I’ve never seen a moth like this before and would like to request your assistance in identifying.
Thanks!
Signature: Chris

Wood Nymph Moth

Wood Nymph Moth

Dear Chris,
This is a Wood Nymph Moth in the genus Eudryas  which can be found on BugGuide.  Many of our readers call this a “Bird Poop” Moth because it seems to resemble bird droppings which may afford it some degree of camouflage protection.

Thank you so much!!!!! I’m sharing the info with my coworkers now 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large moth
Location: Sheffield england
May 26, 2016 8:08 am
Hi as my son played in the garden he shouted for us to look at his leg and there was this big giant like moth clung onto his trousers I uploaded the pic on another site but it says its a brown bat unless that’s the name off that type of moth I don’t think its a brown bat as it would be far to small and it was 15:00 hours when it was out can you identify what it may be
Signature: sarah

Eyed Hawkmoth

Eyed Hawkmoth

Dear Sarah,
We have identified your Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae as an Eyed Hawkmoth,
Smerinthus ocellata, thanks to the UK Moths site where it states:  “Fairly well distributed throughout England and Wales, this species has a sombre, camouflaged appearance at rest, but if provoked, flashes the hindwings, which are decorated with intense blue and black ‘eyes’ on a pinkish background.  The adults fly from May to July, inhabiting woodland and suburban localities.”  If you look closely at one of your images, you can see the “eyes” on the colorful hindwings barely visible.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination