From the monthly archives: "May 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Kind of Bug is this?
Location: Suburbs of Chicago
May 27, 2016 6:01 pm
I am a student photographer and as an assignment I am to photograph nature and then explain my pictures. I took about 100 pictures (manual and automatic, color and black and white). After looking online no one in my family can identify this bug. It seems to not be using its 5th and 6th legs and it isn’t flying, maybe a wing is broken.
Signature: Autumn

Braconid, we believe

Unknown Ichneumon

Dear Autumn,
We do not yet have a species identification, but we have determined that your parasitic Wasp must be in the superfamily Ichneumonoidea, which according to BugGuide has only two families, the Braconids and the Ichneumons.  Our money was originally on this being a female Braconid, but our browsing through both families on BugGuide did not produce species that even looks similar.  We are posting your request as Unidentified and we hope it does not remain so tagged for long.

Ichneumon, possibly

Unknown Ichneumon

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
Definitely an ichneumon, and pretty, but I have no idea which one.  Sorry!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moths are these?
Location: East Coulee Alberta
May 27, 2016 8:26 pm
These two were spotted east of Drumheller Alberta. Im curious what they are called.
Signature: Curious Kim

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Dear Curious Kim,
We turned to the Sphingidae of the Americas site to verify the identity of your mating Sphinx Moths, and we have determined that they are mating Modest Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we are amused at their seemingly immodest behavior.  The species is also called the Poplar Sphinx, and it resembles a closely related species, Pachysphinx occidentalis, which has been “delisted” on the species from Alberta page of Sphingidae of the Americas.  Interestingly the species page on Sphingidae of the Americas still states:  “Pachysphinx occidentalis occidentalis, the Big Poplar Sphinx (Wing span: 5 1/8 – 5 7/8 inches (13 – 15 cm)), flies in riparian areas and suburbs from Alberta and North Dakota west to eastern Washington; south to Texas, Arizona, southern California, and Baja California Norte.”  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a conclusive identification and perhaps indicate why the second species was “delisted.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green caterpillar feeding on Azalea
Location: Minneapolis, MN
May 28, 2016 8:48 am
This morning while picking off azalea sawflies, I found this caterpillar on my “Northern Lights”
azalea . In 15 years of springtime sawfly activity I have never seen a caterpillar like this; on or off an azalea! If you could ID this I would be very grateful.
Signature: Joanne K., Minneapolis

Humped Green Fruitworm

Humped Green Fruitworm

Dear Joanne,
Your distinctive caterpillar belongs to the Copper Underwing,
Amphipyra pyramidoides, and it is sometimes called a Humped Green Fruitworm, according to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are general feeders on leaves of many broadleaf trees and shrubs, including apple, basswood, hawthorn, maple, oak, walnut, raspberry, viburnum, grape, greenbrier (Smilax)” and thanks to your submission, our readers will know to also search for them feeding on Azalea.

Gosh, that was quick!
Thanks so much, he is quite beautiful.
Thanks again.
Joanne K

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Maine USA
May 28, 2016 7:00 am
My friend took pictures of these bugs and we cannot figure out what they are.
Signature: Emil Falkenberry

Stonefly Exuvia

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Emil,
These are the Exuviae or cast off exoskeletons of aquatic nymphs of Stoneflies, known as a naiads, so we are guessing these images were taken close to a stream or river.  Of the Stonefly family, BugGuide notes:  ”
nymphs occur primarily under stones in cool unpolluted streams; some species occur along rocky shores of cold lakes, in cracks of submerged logs, and debris that accumulates around stones, branches, and water diversion grills.  spring and summer adults may be found resting on stones and logs in the water, or on leaves and trunks of trees and shrubs near water; winter stoneflies are often attracted to concrete bridges over streams, and some species are commonly found on snow or resting on fence posts during the warmer days of late winter.”  Though we cannot be certain of the species, your images resemble the Exuviae of the Beautiful Stone, 
Paragnetina immarginata, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Since one of your images appears to be up-side-down, we are guessing they may have been taken on a bridge overhang.

Stonefly Exuviae

Stonefly Exuviae

Thank you so much and yes they were under a bridge by water.  🙂  Have a great weekend.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant alien-like bug
Location: Deerfield, New York
May 27, 2016 8:21 pm
I came across this huge insect in our local grocery store’s parking lot late at night (11:30pm EST) in Deerfield, NY. It had a mission as it wobbled right along. What is it? Scared the heck out of me! Such a strange looking thing. My pic is the second attachment but my friend took a pic (first attachment) of what I believe to be the same bug I encountered and she lives not too far from where I saw mine. Hope to hear from you soon as I’m very curious!
Signature: Erica W.

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Erica,
This is a predatory Giant Water Bug, commonly called a Toe-Biter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Goldsmith
Location: Maine
May 28, 2016 3:19 am
I found this bug that I believe to be a goldsmith bug on my screen. It stayed there quite a while so I pulled it off. It appeared to be dead. When I was taking pictures of it, I thought I may have seen his legs move some. Do these bugs typically not move much or do you think this bug is dead or dying? Can you identify some of the parts? Does it bite or pinch at all?
Thanks
Gs
Ps: coincidentally last nights jeopardy final was re Poe’s The Gold Bug.
Signature: Gs

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Dear Gs,
How interesting that this sighting of a Goldsmith Beetle coincided with the Jeopardy final regarding Poe’s classic The Gold Bug which was allegedly based on a Goldsmith Beetle.  It is difficult to speculate on the cause of your individual’s inactivity.  Temperature may have been a factor.  We suspect you found this Goldsmith Beetle on your screen because it was attracted to light.  According to BugGuide:  “Occasionally attracted to lights.”  It is also possible that this individual was nearing the end of its life, hence its lethargy, and we would not rule out that its life may have ended because of exposure to toxins or poisons.  Normally, Scarab Beetles are not as active as Ground Beetles, but the behavior you describe does not sound like the behavior we would expect from a healthy Goldsmith Beetle.  It is possible that a person handling a Goldsmith Beetle may experience a slight pinch because of the spiny features on the legs.

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination