From the monthly archives: "May 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Satan’s spawn
Location: Northern Maine
May 29, 2016 6:34 pm
Any idea what this could be? Was in northern Maine near The Forks and river. Quite a few around. Bleeeeeech!
Signature: Nanci “I’m not touching that” Sullivan

Hellgrammite

Hellgrammite

Dear Nanci,
This is the larva of a Dobsonfly, and we are very amused at your subject line because Dobsonfly Larvae are known as Hellgrammites, and we have never to our satisfaction been able to determine the etymology of that name, which might actually mean “Satan’s Spawn.”  Though they are not considered dangerous, Hellgrammites can deliver a painful pinch that might even draw blood in some instances.  Hellgrammites are a prized bait for freshwater fishermen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of roach is this?
Location: Southern Louisiana
May 30, 2016 2:26 am
Usually I see flying cockroaches or the wingless females, this one I’ve never come across. It’s darker in color with shorter legs and antennae. I never kill anything I find indoors, but I like to observe them before setting them free outside.
I was just curious since this one isn’t the usual kind I find.
Thanks!
Signature: #buglivesmatter

Female Sand Cockroach

Probably Immature Surinam Cockroach

Dear #buglivesmatter,
At first we thought that this was a flightless female Sand Cockroach in the genus
Arenivaga, and though BugGuide does not list any species in Louisiana, that just means no one in Louisiana has submitted any images to the site.  There are several species listed in nearby Texas, including the Boll’s Sandroach, which is pictured here on BugGuide.  The more we looked at your individual, the more we began to doubt that it was a Sand Cockroach.  We now believe, based on this BugGuide image, that it is an immature Surinam Cockroach, Pycnoscelus surinamensis, a species that according to BugGuide has “Nymphs look similar to the Oriental cockroach but can be easily distinguished by the rough appearence of the posterior abdomen.”  It is difficult to make out that detail in your image, so we would not rule out that it might be an immature Oriental Cockroach.  Of the Surinam Cockroach, BugGuide notes:  “Reproduces through parthenogenesis in the US, where no males are found. It has two sexes in some parts of the world (Europe and Indo-Malaysia), though. Unlike many roaches, the egg capsule is retained inside the female’s abdomen until young are ready to emerge.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It has 2 centimeter black things on its head and wings
Location: Clinton, CT
May 29, 2016 5:29 pm
Dear bugman please let me know what this bug is
Signature: Ross

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear Ross,
This is a male Spring Fishfly, Chauliodes rastricornis, and according to BugGuide:  “The comb-like, (pectinate) antennae of the males are quite obvious” while “The antennae of females are serrate (saw-like).”  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults typically fly late spring: March?-May (North Carolina), April-May (West Virginia). Seen into early June in New England (Massachusetts–guide photo). Further south, much of year (Florida).”  This individual seems right on time for your part of New England.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect ID
Location: Northampton, MA, USA
May 29, 2016 11:39 am
I was using a new macro lens the other day and found this insect. Try as I might – and I am quite skilled in Internet searches- I was unable to identify it. I even posted it on my FB page and friends have suggested beetle, lacewing, male praying mantis or katydid. I just don’t see it.
If, when you identify, you could also explain the 2 black tips, I would appreciate it.
Thanks very much!
Signature: Keitheley Wilkinson

Pale Green Assassin Bug

Pale Green Assassin Bug

Dear Keitheley,
Thanks to this BugGuide image, we are confident that your Assassin Bug is
Zelus luridus, a species commonly called the Pale Green Assassin Bug, which BugGuide  notes is “rather unfortunate invention, given color variation.”  BugGuide also notes:  “The base color of Z. luridus is apple green, and markings on the back may be very dark or rather light. The legs sometimes have dark or red bands on the distal ends of the femurs, but these can often be so light as to be almost invisible. When I’ve seen mating pairs, the males tend to be the darker ones, with the more pronounced red leg bands. The best feature for recognition is the pair of delicate spines on the rear corners of the pronotum, which are rather long on the light colored individuals and shorter on the dark.”  The “2 black tips” to which you refer are those delicate spines, and we suspect they may have evolved to make swallowing a Pale Green Assassin Bug more difficult, thereby dissuading predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pool bugs?
Location: North Salem, NY
May 29, 2016 10:53 am
Hello!
These critters were found crawling out of the pool skimmer baskets and into the pool, where they didn’t do so well. What on earth are they?
Signature: Annie

Mole Cricket "Swimming"

Mole Cricket “Swimming”

Dear Annie,
This is a Mole Cricket, and they are subterranean dwellers, NOT aquatic insects, though this is not our first report of a “Swimming” Mole Cricket.  Mole Crickets can also fly, and we get reports of Mole Crickets from all over the planet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help me identify
Location: 54° 55′ 59.99″ N, 2° 58′ 59.99″ W
May 29, 2016 5:50 am
Hi. When I was walking i found this what i believe to be a type of stonefly but couldn’t identify it. Could you please tell me what it is? The insect was with what i guess was it’s mate foraging for food. They were beside an estuary where they occasionally were flying off then returning. The insects averagely were about 7 cm within length. The Picture Should have sent with this e-mail, The Geographical location is estimated but i hope the location should help Thanks.
Signature: Yours Scincirley

Stonefly

Stonefly

We agree that this is a Stonefly in the order Plecoptera.  We have determined that your global coordinates are in the UK.  This appears to be a flightless species as the wings do not look long enough to allow flying.  Alas, we have been unable to locate any matching Stoneflies online.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination