From the monthly archives: "May 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Moth
Location: Collierville, TN 38017
May 31, 2016 9:13 pm
Hello,
Found this beautiful fellow outside my house in Collierville, TN. Thought at first he was a Lime Hawk, but while the colors are similar, the patterns differ. Then, too, this is far from the Lime Hawk natural range. This photo was taken at night with artificial lighting. I’ll try to get a daylight shot tomorrow a.m., if he’s still there.
Thanks!
Signature: Nature’s Appreciative Spectator

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Nature’s Appreciative Spectator,
Your beauty is a Pandorus Sphinx, a North American species, unlike the Lime Hawkmoth, which is native to Europe, though we did report a North American sighting of a Lime Hawkmoth many years ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never saw this one
Location: Pennsylvania
May 31, 2016 5:10 pm
Hey bugman,
My son happened to find this interesting looking flying bug. It was buzzing along the grass. Not sure if it was injured. Any idea?
Signature: Sincerely, Mike from Philly

Ichneumon

Female Stump Stabber, missing her ovipositor

Dear Mike from Philly,
We can tell you that this is a parasitic Ichneumon Wasp, but we are having trouble conclusively identifying it to the species level, so we have contacted Eric Eaton and explained out doubts.  The yellow antennae and shape of the abdomen rule out a male
Megarhyssa atrata which is pictured on BugGuide and Beetles in the Bush, and all the examples of  Therion morio on BugGuide have black heads.  What this Ichneumon looks most like to us is a female Stump Stabber, Megarhyssa atrata, but with a missing ovipositor, a condition we could not really explain.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We will get back to you when we hear from Eric Eaton.

Ichneumon

Maimed Female Stump Stabber

Definitely agree with you that it closely resembles the female stump stabbed after doing a little more research on the Internet.  But why no ovipositor? Can it become disconnected when/after laying its eggs? Could a bird have eaten just that part of it? Hopefully Mr.  Eaton has an idea.
Thank you so much for responding to me.  Can’t wait to tell my son.  Keep me posted.

Eric Eaton Confirms our suspicions
Daniel:
This is a *female* M. atrata that has lost her ovipositor.  Sometimes they get “stuck” while in operation, and/or the wasp needed to flee a potential predator.  I have frequently found ovipositors lodged in logs or stumps, the wasp having been consumed by a predator while in the act of laying eggs.
Eric

Thanks for the confirmation Eric.
I have heard that sometimes the females get stuck while ovipositing and cannot withdraw, dying in the act.  Is that also true?
Daniel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Manzanar bug
Location: Manzanar, CA
May 31, 2016 10:54 am
Can you please let me know what this is?
Signature: Jen

Iron Cross Blister Beetle

Iron Cross Blister Beetle

Dear Jen,
This is one of our favorite last spring sightings from California and Arizona, the Iron Cross Blister Beetle.  Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae should be handled with caution as they are able to exude a compound known as cantharidin that may cause blistering in human skin.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Killer Scarab from The Mummy?
Location: a few miles inland of Caesarea, Israel
May 31, 2016 11:35 am
Hi, this guy was waiting for me outside my door when I got home tonight. Didnt move. Just waiting patiently for his moment to jump onto my face. His carapace has some interesting coloration and is slightly smaller than my thumb(he’s a big one). He’s also got some big old wingtips protruding from the back of his shell, so you know he’s a flyer.
Signature: Terrified Yet Fascinated

Scarab Beetle:  Anoxia orientalis

Scarab Beetle: Anoxia orientalis

Dear Terrified Yet Fascinated,
We have correctly identified your Scarab Beetle as Anoxia orientalis thanks to the Israel’s Nature Site, and we verified that identification on The Scarabs of the Levant where it states:  “This species is widely distributed in Eastern Europe, Turkey and Levant: Syria, Lebanon (Beirut, Saida) and Israel (Haifa).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big flying bug on porch
Location: Mentor,ohio
May 31, 2016 4:22 pm
Hi ! Is anyone able to identify this bug? Thanks! He was on my porch,has big wings, and I think is hurt so please answer asap!
Signature: From

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

This is the third image of a Male Spring Fishfly we have posted this week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar/Inchworm Michigan
Location: Redford, Michigan
May 31, 2016 6:40 am
Dear Bugman,
This little caterpillar fell on my arm, while I was sitting under a Black Walnut Tree in southeastern Michigan on 5/28/2016. He was quite small, maybe inch long and a quarter inch wide.
Thank you for the service you provide.
Signature: Kristin

Filament Bearer

Filament Bearer

Dear Kristin,
This Inchworm is one of the Filament Bearers in the genus
Nematocampa, an identification that can be verified on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination