From the daily archives: "Wednesday, April 20, 2016"

Subject: Tiny orange bugs
Location: Everett, WA
April 20, 2016 7:31 am
These are all over our garden boxes! What on earth are they?!(you have to zoom in on the picture……tons and tons of tiny orange bugs)
Signature: Erin

Springtails

Springtails

Dear Erin,
These are most surely Springtails in the order Collembola, and we did a search for orange Springtails in Washington, which led us to the BugGuide image of a single tiny individual in the genus
Tomocerus.  Springtails are benign creatures that can be a nuisance if they are too plentiful.  According to BugGuide:  “Springtails are ‘decomposers’ that thrive mostly on decaying organic matter, especially vegetable matter. They may also graze on spores of molds and mildews, especially indoors where there is a lack of other food sources.”

Springtails

Springtails

Subject: red & black bug
Location: Western Washington State
April 18, 2016 12:25 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I took this photo on my deck last night. There were 20-30 of these red and black bugs all over my Lamb’s ear plant. I live in the Western slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Washington state and have never seen this particuler bug before.
Can you ID it?
Signature: Machele Brodie

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Dear Machele,
This Whitecrossed Seed Bug,
Neacoryphus bicrucis, according to BugGuide, is found in “Fields, meadows; adults come to light.”

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
April 19, 2016 3:01 pm
Dear bugman,
I saw this bug at home yesterday for the first time ever, and I have no idea what it is. I hope you can help me identify it! I’m in Argentina and fall is just starting here. It’s been very humid and rainy for the past couple of weeks.
Signature: Mercedes

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Dear Mercedes,
This sure looks like a North American Ailanthus Webworm Moth,
Atteva aurea, to us.  Based on this Zoo Keys article, we believe your species is Atteva pustulella.  According to Eco Registros, the latter species is found in Argentina.

Subject: Surprise Tenant Larva
Location: Coryell County, TX
April 19, 2016 9:22 pm
Hello, hope you are both well.
I discovered this larva living inside one of the blooming apple-blossom amaryllis plants. Its abdomen end looks remarkably like a snake’s face to me, and its body also resembles a bird dropping when curled. It curled up when I moved it gently to the petals, and when moved back it resumed its head-down, posterior snake-face-showing stance. It has gold iridescent spots along lateral (subdorsal?) lines.
As you can see, it’s eating itself out of house and home. 😀
I tried to match it to known moths and butterflies in our county, but had no luck.
Lots of rain this week, upper 60’s and cloudy.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Cutworm

Cutworm

Hi Ellen,
We believe this is a Cutworm, the caterpillar of an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae.  We have a difficult time distinguishing different species as so many caterpillars in this large family look so similar.  You can try browsing BugGuide to see if you find any likely candidates.  Many species are not terribly particular about what plants they feed upon, which complicates identification.

Subject: Flying ant or termite?
Location: Midwest – USA
April 19, 2016 8:49 pm
I think these are flying termites.. but not totally sure. What do you think?
Signature: Steve

Termite Alates

Termite Alates

Dear Steve,
The equal size of the four wings indicate that these are swarming Termite Alates that will mate and begin a new colony.

Subject: please identify this bug
Location: sheffield uk
April 20, 2016 1:09 am
Hi I have been finding these insects in my newly built house, and really need to know what they are and how to remove them, can u help?! Thanks
Signature: stacey

Possibly Flour Beetle

Possibly Flour Beetle

Dear Stacey,
Small beetles like this found in the home are generally either wood boring species or pantry pests.  We believe your individual is a Flour Beetle in the genus
Tribolium.  According to Pied Piper:  “Both the confused and red flour beetles, known as “bran bugs,” primarily attack milled grain products, such as flour and cereals. Both adults and larvae feed on grain dust and broken kernels, but not the undamaged whole grain kernels. These beetles often hitchhike into the home in infested flour and can multiply into large populations. Some survive on food accumulations in cabinet cracks, crevices, and furniture. Confused flour beetles are the most abundant and injurious insect pest of flour mills in the U.Kingdom, United States and Australia. They do not bite or sting humans or pets, spread disease, or feed on or damage the house or furniture.  In addition to milled grain products, beetle specimens have been found in barley, breakfast cereals, corn, cornmeal, crackers, flour, millet, oats, rice, rye, wheat and wheat bran, nutmeats, dried fruits, legume seeds, beans, milk chocolate, cottonseed, peas, powdered milk, sunflower seeds, vetch seeds, spices, herbarium and museum specimens” so you may want to check the pantry for the site of the infestation.