From the daily archives: "Thursday, April 14, 2016"

Subject: Large Mantis posing
Location: Cape Town South Africa
April 14, 2016 6:54 am
took pictures from that nice mantis.
she was posing very nice and looked into the lense
size was r.a. 15cm so thats a huge bugger
Signature: ThunderPie

Mantis

Mantis

Dear ThunderPie,
The bright blue color on the inside of the raptorial front leg that is visible in one of your images seems like an excellent identification feature, and that supposition proved correct when we found this matching image of
 Polyspilota aeruginosa on iSpot.  According to Exotic Pets, the common name is the Madagascan Marbled Praying Mantis.  Your individual appears to be a more slender male.

Mantis

Mantis

Subject: Curious like a tank bug, FL 32960
Location: Vero Beach, Florida 32960
April 14, 2016 6:58 am
Dear Bugman,
Trusting this finds you well. Quick outline, have spotted this particular bug a baker’s dozen times in the last ten years in the city of Vero Beach Treasure Coast of Florida US. I have posted pick on fb, but don’t know what species it is. It is a curious and slow moving creature. Size wise 1/4′ heigh x 1″ long, dark in color with orange dots on the end of the antenai (sp?)
If you can identify, at your conveniece that would be cool. I’ll check out a few other resources too, and post back if I find anything interesting.
Florida Tank Bug
Signature: Curious about a bug

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

This is a Big Legged Bug in the genus Acanthocephala.  Though your image is blurry, based on your location and your description about the “orange dots on the end of the antenai,” we are relatively confident this is Acanthocephala terminalis, a species well represented on BugGuide.

Subject: Please identify?
Location: Haywood County, NC
April 14, 2016 6:18 am
We have had an ‘outbreak’ of these beetles by our garage door. There are hundreds of them. We had mulch blown in a couple of weeks ago and are trying to determine if they came in that way or if this is just your every day beetle apocalypse.
Signature: Buggy in NC

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle:  Lytta aenea

Dear Buggy in NC,
This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, a group with a complicated life cycle.  Larvae are generally predatory and very particular about their hosts, and depending upon the species of Blister Beetle, they generally parasitize solitary bees or grasshoppers.  We have identified your Blister Beetle as
Lytta aenea, based on this BugGuide image.  When conditions are right, there can be large population explosions of adult Blister Beetles that feed on vegetation.  According to BugGuide:  “recorded larval hosts: Colletes thoracicus (Colletidae) adults recorded feeding on Amelanchier, Carya, Crataegus, Fagaceae, Malus, Pirophorum, Prunus, and Salicaceae.”  Blister Beetles should only be handled with caution as they are able to exude a compound, cantharidin, that can cause blistering and irritation in human skin.  

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Cape Town South Africa
April 14, 2016 6:35 am
Hello,
I took some pictures of a huge grasshopper.
Think its a juvenile, cause it had no proper wings developed.
Size was r.a. 12cm which is really big for a grasshopper
Picture was taken on mid november in Cape Town
Signature: ThunderPie

Koppie Foam Grasshoppers

Koppie Foam Grasshoppers

Dear ThunderPie,
Based on this and other images posted to iSpot, we have identified this as a Koppie Foam Grasshopper,
Dictyophorus spumans, one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  Many species feed on milkweed, and they are able to process and absorb the toxic compounds in the plant, which gives the Grasshoppers protection against predators.  Many members of the family advertise with aposomatic or warning colors.

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Subject: Morocco Cricket ID
Location: Tahgdilt Track, Morocco
April 13, 2016 11:18 am
Hi,
Whilst on holiday in Morocco last week, I photographed this intriguing cricket on the Tahgdilt Track (near Boumalne du Dades). Any ideas on which species it is please?
Kind regards
Signature: Ollie

Toad Grasshopper, we believe

Toad Grasshopper, we believe

Dear Ollie,
Though common names for insects differ depending upon many factors, in North America, Crickets are different Orthopterans than this Grasshopper in the suborder Caelifera.  We believe, based on this image posted to Loretta Steyn’s Images, this might be a Toad Grasshopper in the family Pamphagidae.  Getty Images has an image identified as being in the genus Eremotettix that also looks quite similar to your image.  The Getty Image was taken by Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki, who frequently helps us with Katydid identifications, and we will try to contact him to see if he can verify the identification of your Grasshopper.