From the daily archives: "Sunday, April 10, 2016"

Subject: Leaving Las Vegas
Location: Las Vegas
April 10, 2016 9:49 am
We found 3 of these bugs in our suitcase as we were leaving Las Vegas this weekend. Please help us identify.
Signature: Matt

Sawtooth Grain Beetle

Sawtooth Grain Beetle

Dear Matt,
We believe this is a Sawtooth Grain Beetle,
Oryzaephilus surinamensis, one of numerous species of small, brown beetles that infest stored foods.  Compare your individual to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is a “serious pest of stored grain; presence in household products is incidental and causes little concern; does not attack unbroken grain, but uses small lesions on the surface to gain entrance.”

Looks like a perfect match.  Thank you so much for the quick response.

Subject: Red Bugs hatching from line of eggs
Location: Houston, Tx
April 10, 2016 9:29 am
Helloooooo
My wife, our 3 yr old and I would like some help identifying these interesting bugs we found hatching out of a line of eggs on our wooden gate.
Season: spring (April 10th)
Location: Houston, Tx
Signature: James, Carly and BoBo

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Dear James, Carly and BoBo,
These are hatchling True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and we believe they are hatchling Leaf Footed Bugs or Big Legged Bugs in the family Coreidae.  Hatchlings can be very difficult to identify to the species level.  Your individuals look like those represented in this BugGuide image. 

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: NYC, Manhattan
April 10, 2016 9:28 am
Hi Bugman –
I stumbled upon your website when I decided to do a little detective work to identify a bug I have encountered several times in my apartment.
I live in NYC, in a high rise on the 35th floor. I have found this type of bug more than once in my bathtub. It has a rounded body, though it looks sort of oblong in the photo. It’s very small – smaller than an adult bedbug, and quite fast, so the pictures are not as clear as they could be.
I though it could be a juvenile cockroach but I have seen those and they are quite a bit flatter. This bug has a substantial, rounded backside. It’s abdomen resembles that of a black widow spider but this is clearly not a spider. Any thoughts?
So curious! Your help will be appreciated.
Signature: Tommy G

Spider Beetle

Spider Beetle

Dear Tommy,
This is a Spider Beetle in the subfamily Ptininae.  Though your images lack critical detail, we believe this is a Smooth Spider Beetle,
Gibbium aequinoctiale, and according to BugGuide, they are found in “Mainly houses, flour mills, occasionally warehouses, hospitals, stores” where they feed upon a “wide variety of dead organic materials; may be a dry stored product pest.”  You should check the pantry for the site of the infestation.

Subject: Spider in Poway Garden
Location: Poway CA
April 10, 2016 4:02 am
April 6th my kids found this spider in our empty rain gauge.. Poor guy is probably relocated now because it is pouring now! Thanks
Signature: JR

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear JR,
This is a harmless, native Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the genus
Olios.  They are nocturnal hunters that do not spin webs for snaring prey.

Great thank you! So it’s a good guy out in our garden. Great to hear. And I love your website. Keep up the good work!

Subject: Ant/wasp…i dunno
Location: Zimbabwe, Harare
April 10, 2016 3:05 am
Hi bugman
I found this bug i’ve never seen before. Actually it found me…ouch! Please let me know what it is.
Thanks
Signature: R.C

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear R. C.,
Though they are commonly called Velvet Ants in North America, members of the family Mutillidae are actually wasps.  Males are winged and look like typical wasps, but flightless female Velvet Ants more closely resemble Ants.  Velvet Ants are reported to have a very painful sting.  If you are interested, our good friend Lepidopterist Julian Donahue just forwarded us this marvelous link to BBC Earth regarding Velvet Ants.

Thanks Daniel!
Very informative article.

Subject: Is this a tick?
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
April 10, 2016 12:49 am
Over the course of the past year I have found several of these in my home, and at my workplace. I have always found them crawling on walls, always very small (smaller than the size of a pin head). They squish very easily (I did not want the chance of anyone getting bitten if it was a tick) and do not move quickly. We do have a cat that goes in and out, and live in a heavily wooded area, so thought they could possibly be tick in a nymph or larvae stage coming in on the cat. As I have said, always found on walls, sometimes quite high up.
Signature: Kayla

Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion

Dear Kayla,
This is a harmless, beneficial Pseudoscorpion that will help keep your home and work free of other, potentially problematic pest species as it is a predator.