From the daily archives: "Saturday, April 9, 2016"

Subject: Please Help!! Invasion. Pest control has no clue
Location: Pooler, GA (next to Savannah)
April 6, 2016 2:22 pm
Hello, after going through 2 pest control companies we are still invaded by a bug that just won’t go away. From April to about mid October, everyday, we had thousand of the bug in picture. during winter no problem and now for about 2 days they are coming back. Please help identify this bug. They are all over our entrance door.
Signature: Desperate person

Midge

Midge

Dear Desperate person,
We believe these are Midges, non-biting relatives of Mosquitoes from the family Chironomidae.  The plumose antennae on the individual in the close-up image indicates that is a male Midge. This BugGuide image of a member of the genus
Chironomus looks quite close.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are usually found in sediments, and can occur in highly polluted conditions or in relatively clean water. Larvae of the Ch. decorus group, Ch. riparius and Ch. stigmaterus are most often associated with high nutrient/low oxygen conditions.”  Do you live near a pond or swamp?  That might be the source of your problem.

Midges

Midges

Hello Daniel,
Thank you for your answer. Yes, I have a pond on the back side of my yard and there is a swamp behind the houses across the steer from me. However, from all the houses I was the only one with the bugs 🙁
Hopefully this will help find a fix. Thanks again!!
Caroline

Hi again Caroline,
If your house is the only one experiencing this problem, try to identify what makes your house different.  The light color paint on the walls and ceiling might be attracting the Midges, so a darker color might not be as attractive to them.  Is there a light that is left on?  That might also be a factor.

No, there is no light on. They actually come during the day and leave at night… We took all our pine straws away and underneath was pretty moist. I am hoping this was the issue. I saw some last week and started to panic at the idea that I would have to see these bugs everyday for the next 6 months. Another thing I noticed is that they do not come after it rained. But 24h after and they are back.

Subject: What is it
Location: Central florida
March 31, 2016 9:23 am
We found this on our blueberries
What is it?
Signature: Larry32773

Galls on Blueberries

Galls on Blueberries

Dear Larry32773,
This has been on our back burner for the past week, and though we have done some research, we have drawn a blank.  Our initial thought is this is some type of Gall.  A Gall is a growth on a plant that can be caused by an insect or by some other organism.  These Galls, if that is what they are, do not appear to be caused by an insect.  We will continue to research this matter.

Galls on Blueberries

Galls on Blueberries

Thank you.
I was thinking it might be a fungus if not an insect.
Larry Lackey

Some Galls are caused by fungus infections.

Subject: Our black/orange friend from São Paulo, Brazil
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
April 9, 2016 4:14 pm
Hello,
We really would like to identify our little friend from the image.
Photo taken in São Paulo, Brazil.
Signature: David Lynch

Shield Bug:  Pachycoris torridus

Shield Bug: Pachycoris torridus

Dear David,
We quickly located a Shield Bug on Insetologia that greatly resembles your individual, but it is green instead of black.  We tried researching that name, and we found this image on FlickR that looks like a very good match.  Images on Biodiversidade Teresopolis indicate this is a highly variable species.  This image on FlickR documents the maternal behavior of some species in the family.

Subject: Sawfly or ant drone?
Location: Brazos County, Texas, USA
March 27, 2016 4:37 pm
Hello! I had asked Texas A&M as well but I’ll ask here as well. We did a catch-and-release of what looked like a sawfly last night (well, failed release because the door was still open and it flew back into the light, so we’re still checking the house for a body).
My stepfather is still moving his own photos and videos off his cameras, but the jaws seem to match a sawfly, the eyes seemed proportionately large, and the thorax was prominently hunched. I compared to other photos I saw of sawflies, but the abdomen was longer. It was maybe an inch and a half long.
A&M agreed that it looked like a sawfly, so we narrowed down our own image searches for an exact match; but when we did happen to find an exact match, the page did not say “sawfly,” it said “red driver ant.” We looked that insect up, and it did indeed match the dorylus drone perfectly… except, that’s an African army ant… so now I’m really hoping we didn’t just catch and release evidence of an invasive species.
Any input you have will be greatly appreciated, and if you respond, I’ll try to send you the macros from my stepfather as soon as possible.
Signature: M. Sidney Beal

Legionary Ant

Legionary Ant

Dear M. Sidney Beal,
Please forgive us the long delay.  Our tiny staff cannot answer all the mail we receive and we are currently going through older identification requests for interesting postings, and your posting has us quite excited.  We are also struck by the resemblance to the Middle Eastern Sausage Fly, a male Driver Ant in the genus
Dorylus.  Searching that lead, we believe this is a male Legionary Ant in the genus Neivamyrmex, based on this and other images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, Legionary Ants and other Army Ants in the Tribe Ecitonini have “huge, wingless queens and wasplike males unlike those of any other ants.”  We would not discount that it is another member of the family, but the Legionary Ants seem to be the most common.

This is actually great timing! My suspicions were right that it died inside the house, and my stepfather just today found the body. Minus one antenna, it seems to be otherwise intact, and we now have it in a jar for safekeeping. When we have new photos taken, I’ll forward any my family sends me.
After I last responded to A&M, their ant expert also seemed to agree that it’s most likey a neivamyrmex. Thank you for responding.

Subject: Help!
Location: Central Texas
March 26, 2016 4:48 pm
Can you please help us identify this bug?
Signature: Abby

Possibly Scorpionfly

Possibly Scorpionfly

Dear Abby,
We believe this is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera, but we cannot find any images of individuals with black wings and an orange body on BugGuide other than
Panorpa lugubris, which is definitely not your species.  We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton.  If possible, can you send additional images showing the insect from a lateral view that would show details of the head and mouthparts?  Thanks.

Eric Eaton poses another possibility
Daniel:
I am thinking this is a caddisfly of some kind.
Eric