From the daily archives: "Saturday, April 2, 2016"

Location: Philippines
April 2, 2016 5:20 am
Hey ! Me and my friends found a bug in our backyard, I can’t identify it so can you help us ? If you find out what it is,can I keep it as a pet ?
Signature: Dear,

Leaf Footed Bug

Leaf Footed Bug

You can tell by the enlarged tibiae on the hind legs that this is a Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae.  They are not harmful, but you will need to provide it with the appropriate food if you are going to keep it.  Leaf Footed Bugs feed on the fluids from plants, deriving nutrition by sucking the fluids with the piercing and sucking mouthparts.  We believe your Leaf Footed Bug is a Citron Bug, Leptoglossus gonagra, which we identified on the Flying Kiwi site.  We also found an image on this blog.  According to BugGuide, it is “polyphagous” and a “minor pest of citron groves in FL, major pest on several crops in S. America.”  If you have access to Citron, you can place a ripe fruit in the container to see it it will feed.  If no citron is available, try an orange.

Leaf Footed Bug

Leaf Footed Bug

Subject: Beautiful Snow Prince
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, CA
April 1, 2016 11:22 pm
Hello Bugman!
You answered an email I sent before about a moth, and so I thought I would ask again. I found this beauty while visiting my parents in the SF Bay Area. What kind of moth is he/she? It was such a beautiful creature. 🙂
Thanks for your help. You’re awesome!
Signature: Claire

Vestal Tiger Moth

Vestal Tiger Moth or Fall Webworm???

Dear Claire,
This lovely moth is a Vestal Tiger Moth,
Spilosoma vestalis, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various flowering trees, particularly oak.”  We believe this may be the first example of this species on our site.

That’s exciting! Thanks again, it made my day seeing the post on Facebook! ? Glad to contribute to moth documentation!
Claire

Update:  April 16, 2018
Thanks to a comment by Karoline, we are now wondering if this might be a Fall Webworm moth.

Subject: Unidentified Caterpillar!
Location: Southeastern Arizona
April 1, 2016 10:55 am
Dear bugman,
I found a caterpillar in the pool this morning. He was still alive when I found him, so I took him in and gave him a few leaves from our backyard. We are still unsure what kind of caterpillar he is, or what he eats! Any help?
Signature: Dawn S

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Dawn,
This might be an Underwing Caterpillar in the genus Catocala which is pictured on BugGuide, but we would not rule out any of the other groups in the superfamily Noctuiodea, which includes the Owlet Moths.  We are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and unless the caterpillar was dropped into the pool by a passing bird, we feel confident it was feeding on some plant in your yard.  The plant upon which you photographed it looks like Mesquite, which is pictured on the National Park Service site, which leads us to believe it is a plant close to your pool.  Try offering other leaves from your yard, and if it starts eating, you can place the caterpillar on that plant.  Any additional information like size may help us to narrow down an identification.  We also wondered if this might be a Black Witch Caterpillar, and according to Texas Butterfly Ranch:  “Black Witch Moth caterpillars eat legumes, and favor acacia and mesquite. ”

Update: The caterpillar created a cocoon out of silk. A few weeks later, he hatched into a common , brown moth. (about 1 inch long.) I released him and watched him fly away.

Thanks for the Update.  That was neither a Black Witch or an Underwing Moth, but our general ID from the superfamily Noctuiodea is still most likely correct.

Subject: Guanacaste costa rica
Location: Nosara, guanacaste, costa rica
April 26, 2016 4:10 pm
This bug was rolling what looked like a small ball of dirt or dung very efficiently- almost dribbling it like a soccer ball.
Many of them were huddled in clusters. It was the afternoon on a dirt road.
Signature: Cilan

Immature Red Bug

Immature Red Bug

Dear Cilan,
This is an immature Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae, and it looks like this image posted to FlickR.  We suspect the ball is actually a seed and the Red Bug is feeding from the seed.  Like other insects in the order Hemiptera, the mouth is designed for piercing and sucking.