From the monthly archives: "March 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterflies/moths
Location: Colombia, South America
March 28, 2016 10:28 am
Hello Bugman, well, here are a few insects that I haven’t’ been able to identify. I was travelling through Colombia in January when I spotted these interesting bugs. If you can help me with these critters I’d be eternally grateful!
Happy Easter!
Signature: Coral

Four Spot Green Sailor

Four Spot Green Sailor

Dear Coral,
We know one of these images was left over from the last time you sent a submission, and we are going to request that in the future you please limit the images in one request to a single species, unless there is a very good reason to submit multiple species, like a predator/prey relationship or a mutually symbiotic relationship, or perhaps if they are closely related.  Though we question the term “spots” with relation to this lovely creature, your butterfly is
Dynamine postverta, commonly called the Four Spot Green Sailor which we learned on the Project Noah site.  We verified that identification on Learn About Butterflies where we also learned:  “Most Dynamine species have highly reflective bluish or greenish uppersides, often in combination with a dark apex and borders. Dynamine postverta is easily recognised by the group of 4 squarish dark spots on each forewing. The underside is similar to that of other Dynamine species, being white, marked with narrow bands of orange. In common with several other species there is also a pair of blue-centred submarginal ocelli on the underside hindwings.  Dynamine postverta ( previously known as D. mylitta ) is the commonest and most widespread member of the genus, being found throughout most tropical and subtropical areas of central and South America, from Mexico south to Argentina and Paraguay.”  We also learned:  “The butterflies are very active in hot sunny conditions, when they can be seen flying rapidly in zig-zag fashion, investigating along forest tracks. In the cooler temperatures of early morning they can often be found basking on foliage, usually with their wings held half-open.  Males visit dry river beds, and damp ground along sunlit forest tracks and roads. They habitually flick their wings open while moving about in a fairly erratic fashion as they probe for minerals on the ground.”  The Mexican subspecies is pictured on Butterflies of America.

Hi Daniel, Thank you so much for helping me with the identification of my butterflies!!! It’s so exciting to be finally able to name them!  Keep up the great work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: catfood insects
Location: North central Florida
March 27, 2016 5:52 am
Hi, lately I’ve noticed some kind of insect or something around the catfood bowl. They arrange around a solitary piece of catfood in a flower petal fashion. At first I thought some type of silverfish, but these don’t have any noticeable antennae or feet. I thought they must move extremely slowly, but recently I noticed some move. They appear to gather around a piece of wayward dry catfood for days. When I first saw them, they were completely around a piece of catfood and it looked like (from a distance) a plastic flower or something, so I picked one of them up. They almost cotton-like to the touch. Any ideas?
Signature: //Dan

Case Bearing Moth Larvae eating cat food.

Case Bearing Moth Larvae eating cat food.

Dear Dan,
We are amazed that the organized manner in which these Case Bearing Moth larvae are eating cat food.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this big insect
Location: Oman
March 27, 2016 1:26 pm
What is this big insect
Signature: Ahmed

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Dear Ahmed,
This is a Giant Water Bug in the family Belostomatidae.  This is an aquatic predator that can also fly.  They are reported to give a painful bite if carelessly handled or accidentally encountered in still waters.  In North America, they are called Toe-Biters and swimmers and waders should exercise caution to avoid a painful, but not dangerous bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Athens, GA
March 27, 2016 9:46 am
Please help!
This guy fell on the windshield my car (I did not notice) and rode with me some distance. What is it? If I cannot find its host plant soon, I don’t know what I can do for it. I have tried feeding it a variety of plants to no avail. It is super tiny and very hard to get a good picture. I hope these pictures can assist!
Signature: Rachel

Sawfly Larva

Sawfly Larva

Dear Rachel,
Though it resembles a Caterpillar, your insect is actually a Sawfly Larva, a relative of wasps and bees from the order Hymenoptera.  According to About Education:  “Caterpillars are the larvae of butterflies and moths, which belong to the order Lepidoptera. Sawfly larvae look similar to caterpillars, but are an entirely different kind of insect. Sawflies are related to bees and wasps, and belong to the order Hymenoptera. Like caterpillars, sawfly larvae usually feed on plant foliage.  How can you tell the difference between a sawfly larva and a caterpillar? Count the prolegs. Caterpillars may have up to five pairs of abdominal prolegs (see parts of a caterpillar diagram), but never have more than five pairs. Sawfly larvae will have six or more pairs of abdominal prolegs*. …  There are, of course, exceptions to every rule. Caterpillars of the family Megalopygidae, the flannel moths, are unusual in having 7 pairs of prolegs (2 more pairs than any other Lepidopteran larvae). ”  Your individual appears to have at least seven pairs of pro-legs.  Based on this BugGuide image, we believe your individual may be a Raspberry Sawfly,
Monophadnoides rubi.  If that is the case, according to BugGuide, you should try feeding it rose leaves if you cannot locate raspberry leaves.

Sawfly Larva

Sawfly Larva

Thank you so much for this information! This is so helpful. I had no idea! Wow.
We tried a blackberry leaf earlier. I will go find some rose leaves.
Thank you! Thank you!
Rachel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trinidad Moth
Location: Trinidad & Tobago
March 27, 2016 9:32 am
I found this moth (I suspect it might be a Notodontidae) on the verandah roof of the Asa Wright Nature Centre in Trinidad on 11 March 2016. Could you possibly identify it please?
Regards
Signature: John Perry

Possibly Silkmoth

Possibly Silkmoth

Dear John,
We do not believe this is a Prominent Moth in the family Notodontidae.  Your moth reminds us very much of the North American Spotted Apatelodes, one of the Silkmoths in the family Bombycidae, but we have not had any luck locating a matching image on the internet.  We will continue to research your request, and we will also enlist the assistance of our readership. 

Thanks very much. Prominent was just a guess as it looks vaguely similar to the ones we have here in the UK. I would be very interested to know the results of your research.
Regards
John

Julian Donahue responds
Hi Daniel,
Try Mimallonidae.
Julian

Despite Julian’s suggestion that we research Sack-Bearer Moths from the family Mimallonidae, a family also represented on BugGuide, we have not had any luck with a species.  The family is well represented on Discover Life, but no images match the submitted image.  We did however locate this pdf  on ttfnc entitled On the Number of Moths (Lepidoptera) that Occur in Trinidad and Tobago by Matthew J. W. Cock, and we suspect we may find the answer there if we hunt more.  We will attempt to contact the author, Matthew J.W. Cock for assistance.

Hi again Daniel
Having just looked up Spotted Apatelodes on the web and seen some pics, it reminds me of a moth pic I took at the same place and time as the one I submitted. I attach a very poor pic of it.  I can’t find any evidence that Spotted Apatelodes is found in Trinidad – but it might be closely related.
Regards
John

Same or Different Species???

Same or Different Species???

Thanks for the update John,
This new image does support our initial impression that your moth may be in the family Bombycidae, and we wonder if both of your images are the same species.  When conditions are right, moths (and other insects) from the same species emerge simultaneously which benefits the species as individuals have a better chance of locating a mate.  Since your two images were taken “at the same place and time” we suspect they are the same species as there are similarities in the overall structure, though the markings are not evident on the second image.  Hopefully Matthew J. W. Cock will respond to our request after we located his contact information on the internet.

Julian Donahue supplies additional information
Mimallonidae used to be called Lacosomidae.
But on second thought, and after reviewing the attached PDF (where you can see images of mimallonids–they all pretty much look alike), I think that this moth is a geometrid (forewing cubitus vein appears to be 3-branched).
Here’s the attachment!  15465-5006-1-PB
Julian

Thanks Julian,
I have also written to Matthew J.W. Cock who wrote this article.

Matthew J.W. Cock responds
Dear Daniel
This is a male of what I am calling Apatelodes nina (Stoll) sp. (Apatelodidae).  However, this is a genus and family that needs revision with many undescribed species, so things may change when further work is done.
Kind regards, Matthew

Thank you for your help.  I’m impressed at the speed of your replies!
Regards
John

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Please
Location: Western MA, USA
March 27, 2016 7:09 am
Hi,
I have looked around quite a bit & keep coming up empty handed. For some reason I got “doodlebug” stuck in my head, however that does not seem correct.
It was having issues navigating climbing the stalks & leaves of the low-lying, plants that were stream side. I am not sure if it had just emerged or had some fermented fruit….
Taken 6/3/15 – Holyoke, MA – At a reservoir. I have not seen one since….
Thank you….
Signature: Kristi

Dark Fishfly

Dark Fishfly

Dear Kristi,
Your Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia is only represented on our site with a two postings so we are thrilled with your submission and your excellent quality images.  Based on BugGuide images, we believe your individual is Nigronia fasciata.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”  It is possible that the flight time in various locations is so brief that if one is not looking at that time, it could be years between sightings.

Dark Fishfly

Dark Fishfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination