From the monthly archives: "March 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden SIlk Orb Weaver
Location: East Java, Indonesia
March 29, 2016 12:04 am
Hi, I’m an amateur photographer and I found this Golden Silk Orb Weaver on a mango tree, all I know is that it is of Nephila Genus but I can’t find out about the species. Here’s the story :
The female spider is roughly about 3,5 – 4 inches long (including leg span), I also spot a smaller yet looked very different most likely to be the male roughly about 1 – 1,5 inches long including leg span. It has about 0,75 m x 1 m wide shiny golden web on one side of the mango tree. I also managed to get a sample of her silk which looks very pretty and shiny.
I’m very curious about the species.
Thank you.
Signature: A17N Photography

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear A17N Photography,
You image showing the underside of this Golden Silk Spider does not reveal the markings, but one species found in Java, according to Getty Images, is
Nephila pilipes.   It appears that there are two smaller spiders directly above the female at the top edge of your image, just above the tangle of golden silk that gives this distinctive genus its common name.    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Which Tiger Moth Is This
Location: Sonoma County California
March 27, 2016 7:34 pm
Having trouble identifying this particular Tiger Moth. Can you help?
Signature: Wayne Ball

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Dear Wayne,
Your Tiger Moth is in the genus
Grammia, and many species in this genus look very similar.  We believe this may be Grammia ornata which is reported from Sonoma County on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Periodic Insect In Bedroom!
Location: Toronto, Canada
March 27, 2016 8:10 pm
Hi these days starting in February Toronto, Canada I’ve seen this large insect in my room fly from no where onto my bed when I’m studying! It’s as big as my half index finger! It’s got long legs and crawls… Sorry but I’ve been too scared to touch it and kill them so the first time I saw it I sweeper it out. They seem hard to kill as my brother killed one before after it “revived” after being smashed by a broom twice. They have long antennae. What are they and where do they come from? Do they normally infest rooms?
Signature: J.J

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear J.J,
This Western Conifer Seed Bug is a member of a species originally native to the Pacific Northwest, however, it expanded its range across North America, beginning in the 1960s, presumably with the assistance of humans.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs seek shelter indoors when weather begins to cool, and they become active indoors when the weather outside begins to warm.  At that time, they are noticed as they attempt to gain egress.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gall Insect
Location: Fairfield, California
March 28, 2016 1:40 pm
Hello Bugman!
I have a couple oak galls in a sealed bag and this morning, I found this brilliant green insect walking around on the exterior of one of the galls. I was not expecting to see such a beautiful insect since the gall wasps with which I am familiar are usually black! The galls were collected from the ground under an unidentified species of oak on March 23, 2016, in Fairfield, California. The insect is approximately 3/8 inch in length. Thanks for your help!
Signature: EntoMasterGardener

Possibly Pteromalid

Cuckoo Wasp

Dear EntoMasterGardener,
We are going to go way out on a limb in our response because of the interesting information we have learned while researching your request, and then we will consult Eric Eaton to see how far afield we have gone.  We tried researching green gall wasps and we stumbled upon an image that led us to a Nature Conservation Imaging where we learned the wasp in the image is a Pteromalid in the family Pteromalidae and that “The thousands of other parasitic wasps include the Chalcidoidea, which tend to be tiny and are often known as chalcids. There are more than 1,000 species in Europe including a good number of Pteromalid wasps (3mm). They are predominantly parasitoids, affecting a wide range of insect groups. A few are parasitoids of the larvae of gall wasps, so can emerge from galls, but they are not the causers.”  We then turned to BugGuide to see if we could find any visual matches, and we cannot say for certain that your Wasp resembles any definitively.  The antennae on your wasp are quite distinctive, and we will get back to you once we hear from Eric Eaton.

Eric Eaton sets us straight
Daniel:
Neither.  This is a cuckoo wasp, family Chrysididae.  They are parasites of other solitary wasps, and solitary bees, and perhaps one of the host insects nested inside an abandoned gall and the cuckoo wasp followed it inside.
Eric

Possibly Pteromalid

Cuckoo Wasp

Hi!
Thank you so much for your fast response! I think you are right on track! Through the awesome power of the Internet, my pictures found their way to UC Davis Professor of Entomology Robbin Thorpe and this was his response:
“The beautiful bright metallic green critter in the photos Sharon Leos submitted is a cuckoo wasp, family Chrysididae.  Most are parasitic on aculeate wasps and bees.  Some of which will nest in cavities like the emergence holes in oak galls.  Check out the family Chrysididae on Bug Guide for more illustrations.  For more information on the group, contact Dr. Lynn Kimsey, the Director of our Bohart Museum of Entomology.  Lynn is an expert on the group.  She should be able to identify the critter in more detail.  Lynn can be reached at: lskimsey@ucdavis.edu.  Regards,    Robbin”
I look forward to hearing what you learn from Eric Eaton, as well. Thank you so much! Have a great day!
Cheers!
~sharon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: South Texas
March 28, 2016 5:58 pm
I live in south Texas. We lots of large oak trees. Found these caterpillars under the dead leaves on the ground. What kind of caterpillar is it? And should I be worried
Signature: Luckylisa

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Luckylisa,
There is no cause for concern regarding this awesome Underwing Caterpillar from the genus
Catocala, probably the Ilia Underwing, Catocala ilia.  It is believe that the Ilia Underwing Caterpillar mimics lichens for camouflage.  You can compare your individual to this posting from BugGuide.

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterflies/moths
Location: Colombia, South America
March 28, 2016 10:28 am
Hello Bugman, well, here are a few insects that I haven’t’ been able to identify. I was travelling through Colombia in January when I spotted these interesting bugs. If you can help me with these critters I’d be eternally grateful!
Happy Easter!
Signature: Coral

One Spotted Prepona

One Spotted Prepona

Hi again Coral,
Though by our count there are five spots on the hindwing, yet for some reason your butterfly,
Archaeoprepona demophon, is known as the One Spotted Prepona.  We identified it on Neotropical Butterflies and verified that identification on the North American Butterfly Association site.  Learn About Butterflies calls it the Demophon Shoemaker and states:  “Males perch on tree trunks or on foliage, sitting facing head-downwards and with wings half open. They take part in impressive aerial sorties, chasing each other in broad circles around the tree tops. After each sortie they each return to their original perch.  Both sexes commonly feed at sap runs, rotting fruit, and less commonly at urine, dung or carrion. They descend from the tree tops in a series of steps, pausing for a few minutes at various points on the tree trunk or on foliage.”   Your individual appears to be feeding on rotting fruit.

Hi Daniel, Thank you so much for helping me with the identification of my butterflies!!! It’s so exciting to be finally able to name them!  Keep up the great work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination