From the monthly archives: "March 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Southeast Georgia
March 30, 2016 1:26 am
Noticed these bugs on a pine tree limb.
Signature: Chad smith

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs

Dear Chad,
This appear to be a group of Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs, and some individuals appear to be molting, which is why some are redder than others like in this BugGuide image.  They will darken when the new  exoskeleton begins to harden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Desert Beetle?
Location: Desert between Nevada and California
March 29, 2016 11:11 am
Can you help me identify this bug please? It’s been driving me nuts! 🙂 It looks like a beetle for sure (to me, anyway) because it had a hard shell. It was about the size of a dime. Found in the desert of Zzyzx, CA (the Desert Science Center), it was a dark gray with a white spot on the head and long black legs.
Signature: Lara

Desert Spider Beetle

Desert Spider Beetle

Dear Lara,
This is a Desert Spider Beetle or Inflated Beetle in the genus
Cysteodemus.  According to BugGuide, Cysteodemus armatus has “white to yellow-brown incrustation” which tends to vary from individual to individual, which explains the white head in your image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Hurricane Rd pass, Temblor Range, east of Carrizo Plains, CA
March 29, 2016 7:46 pm
I found this beetle on March 26, 2016 at the top of Hurricane Rd pass in the Temblor Range just East of Carrizo Plains National Monument. It is large – see my fingers for scale. It was the only one of its kind I saw that day and we walked the roadside for over 1.5 miles. The elytra are short and do not come close to covering it’s abdomen, as you can see in the second picture. It did not fly, but fell off my fingers and into the grass. It was found in Bromus grass and Amsinkia. Temperature was about 65 degrees F with a strong wind, ample sunshine.
Signature: Judy Neuhauser

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Dear Judy,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus
Lytta, and we wish you included a view of the beetle’s head because it does not look like the Master Blister Beetle, Lytta magister, a species that is active in Southern California at this time of year, as evidenced by the image we just posted, however the Master Blister Beetle has an orange head and thorax and your individual appears to have a black head.  Also classified in the L. magister group according to BugGuide is Lytta funerea, which is represented by a single posting of a male of the species on BugGuide with three images.  That individual has a black head and orange markings on the abdomen like your individual, and females, which we suspect you encountered, are often bigger with bigger abdomens.  We would urge you to exercise caution when handling Blister Beetles because according to BugGuide:  “Pressing, rubbing, or squashing blister beetles may cause them to exude hemolymph which contains the blistering compound cantharidin. Ingestion of blister beetles can be fatal. Eating blister beetles with hay may kill livestock. Cantharidin is commercially known as Spanish Fly” and is sold as an aphrodesiac.

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Good bug or bad bug
Location: Apache Junction AZ
March 29, 2016 5:33 pm
This insect was found in Apache Junction AZ.
What is it?
Signature: Wondering

Master Blister Beetle

Master Blister Beetle

Dear Wondering,
When it comes to bugs, the adjectives good and bad are quite relative, and this Master Blister Beetle is no exception.  Master Blister Beetles, according to BugGuide, appear in late winter in the states of the Southwest.  Like other members of the genus, Master Blister Beetles should be handled with caution or not at all because according to BugGuide:  “Pressing, rubbing, or squashing blister beetles may cause them to exude hemolymph which contains the blistering compound cantharidin. Ingestion of blister beetles can be fatal. Eating blister beetles with hay may kill livestock. Cantharidin is commercially known as Spanish Fly.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange fly/bug
Location: thornlie, western australia
March 29, 2016 4:55 am
Hi, my mum had a bug/fly land on her and swatted it. It died but is dark in colour but when the photo is taken with flash has amazing colours and a very big sting, similar to a bee but much bigger and with barbs on it.
Signature: Email

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Though it appears to be a stinger, the Cuckoo Wasp is incapable of stinging.  The female uses her stinger-like ovipositor to lay eggs and according to the Brisbane Insect site:  “Most species are external parasites of other wasp larvae. Females lay eggs in nest of other wasps (Eumeninae of Vespidae and  Sphecidae) while the nest host collect food for larvae. Cuckoo Wasp larvae hatch and feed on the food or the host larvae.”

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar Tanzania
Location: Ndutu, Tanzania
March 29, 2016 5:47 am
This large caterpillar c 9cm was found on the ground in the Ndutu area of Serengeti in Tanzania in February. The area was grassland and acacia woodland.
Is it possible to identify it please?
Signature: Mary Berry

Lappet Moth Caterpillar we believe

Lappet Moth Caterpillar we believe

Dear Mary Berry,
We believe this is a Lappet Moth Caterpillar from the family Lasiocampidae.  There is a similar looking image from South Africa on iSpot.

So many thanks for amazingly quick response!   Now scolling through Lappets.
Thanks again Mary

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination