From the monthly archives: "March 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found in bed!
Location: Norfolk, England
March 2, 2016 2:14 am
Hi Bugman,
I found this in my bed last night. I woke up at about 3am and I swear I saw something small glowing in the dark under my thin topsheet. I panicked and threw the blanket off, once I turned on the lights I saw this. What is it? How did it get into my apartment situated on the third floor? Will they keep appearing, eggs? This isnt the first time I have found one of these, I found one in my kitchen a few months back but thought nothing of it.
Thanks
Signature: Scarlett

Soil Centipede

Soil Centipede

Dear Scarlett,
This is not the first posting we have received regarding a bioluminescent Soil Centipede in the order Geophilomorpha.  When we posted images of a Fire Centipede from Gabon, we did much research, but alas, the link to information on
Geophilus carpophagus from the Natural England website appears to be broken and no longer active.  Apheloria has information on a bioluminescent Centipede from Thailand including:  “The centipede … glows … and displays a pair of luminous green spots” and “The genus Orphnaeus, in the order Geophilomorpha, are bioluminescent centipedes that are distributed throughout the Old World Tropics including Africa, Central and South America, Southeast Asia, and Hawaii. Orphnaeus (pronounced “orf-nee-us”) is in my opinion a better candidate for the maeng-kah-reaung; however, I’m almost certain they do not crawl into folks’ ears. They do, according to Kim, smell like poop. (That said, If any myriapod is a candidate for crawling into ears, it’s centipedes – as they are fast, flexible, and cunning!)”  EakringBirds has a Centipedes and Millipedes of Nottinghamshire page with a heading “Confirmation of bioluminescence produced by Geophilus easoni” where it states “We also wanted complete confirmation to our initial identification of G. easoni, ending the still scientifically unknown answer to the question, as to precisely which Centipede (or possibly Centipedes) has the ability to create its own bioluminescence. So two specimens were sent to Tony Barber of the British Myriapod and Isopod Study Group, who quickly confirmed that both were indeed Geophilus easoni.  It seems strange that no one had determined bioluminescence in Centipedes before, although G. easoni had been quoted as being bioluminescent by at least one earlier author. The rarity of such reports may have been why no one has spent any time researching the subject.  Three nocturnal path walks in April and May 2013, yielded a total of 20 G. easoni (identification later confirmed before release). Out of the total, 16 produced varying degrees of bioluminescence. Variability was recorded in the length of time bioluminescence lasted, exactly where bioluminescence was emitted from over the length of the Centipede and the release or non-release of bioluminescent fluid which was found to have a distinct odour akin to a sweet urine smell. Specimens in the larger size range (probably all mature females) seemed to react better than smaller specimens.”  We are relatively certain your Soil Centipede is Geophilus easoni.  You might also find this other, well researched posting of a Soil Centipede interesting.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasite in stool
Location: USA, Egypt, Germany
March 1, 2016 12:50 pm
Hello! I’m hoping you can help me and see what this parasite is. It is white when exposed to air and dries. It is hard, almost like a twig, sometimes with a whip tail on the back and almost looks segmented but doesn’t appear to be the same as a tapeworm. Some sections of it splinters off, possibly male and female sexual productive pieces within the same worm. I’m not sure. It was found in human feces by the dozens. It can be roughly half inch long or longer. It does seem to break apart somewhat easily. I lived in Egypt for a year coming back about 7 months ago to the USA. It could have been caught at either location. Also, spent a night in Germany while traveling between. Thank you so much!
Signature: SarahD

"Worm" in Stool Sample

“Worm” in Stool Sample

Dear SarahD,
We do not have the necessary credentials to diagnose human parasites nor diseases, and we would urge you to see a professional for a diagnosis.  We cannot tell is this is an organism or if it is roughage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a click beetle
Location: Costa rica
March 2, 2016 6:56 am
I saw this in the rain forest near limon in Costa rica. I think its a click beetle.
Signature: James Roberts

Click Beetle

Click Beetle

Dear James,
This really is a pretty Click Beetle in the family Elateridae.  We believe we have correctly identified it as Semiotus insignis on the South Dakota State University site where the range is listed as “Mexico; Guatemala; Nicaragua; Costa Rica; Panama.”  Clicking on the thumbnail produces this enlargement.  We found several other images of mounted specimens online, including this individual for sale on BugManiac, but we couldn’t locate a single image of a living individual.  That makes your submission unique on the web, at least for an identified individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth, Trinidad
Location: Asa Wright, Trinidad
March 1, 2016 1:37 pm
Hi, we found this moth at the Asa Wright center on Trinidad in February. It was about 4 inches across. I’ve been searching but haven’t yet found anything quite like it.
Thanks
Signature: Anne

Giant Silkmoth: Copaxa decrescens

Giant Silkmoth: Copaxa marona

Dear Anne,
This Giant Silkmoth is in the genus
Copaxa, and on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, it most closely resembles Copaxa decrescens, though it is not listed for Trinidad.  It can be viewed on BizLand.  Since you live on an island, your individual may represent a different species or subspecies.  The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History site lists  Copaxa rufinans on Trinidad, but there is no image. We will contact Bill Oehlke to get his opinion.  He may request permission to post your images and we hope you will be amenable to that.

Giant Silkmoth: Copaxa species

Giant Silkmoth: Copaxa marona

Bill Oehlke provides a Correction:  Copaxa marona
Hi Daniel,
It is Copaxa marona which replaces decrescens in French Guiana, Guyana and Suriname and probably in Venezuela and Trinidad. DNA barcoding has shown that decrescens is probably limited to southeastern Brazil
and surrounding areas. This is mentioned on the decrescens page, but I have not updated all the original country checklists. Thanks for thinking of me. I will add marona to Trinidad page and will add it also tentatively to Venezuela page and will remove decrescens as ? from Venezuela, based on DNA barcoding analysis. Hard to tell marona from decrescens just by appearance.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t figure out what bug this is!
Location: Virginia
February 29, 2016 8:56 pm
Hi,
I can’t figure out what kind of bug this is but I have come across a few of them in my apartment. Would you be able to tell me what it is?
Signature: Thanks!

Carpet Beetle

Carpet Beetle

You have Carpet Beetles, a common Household Pest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination