From the monthly archives: "March 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mad as a hornet
Location: San Jose, CA
March 19, 2016 4:26 pm
Five or six of these appeared in my yard and the rest of them are still doing laps but I caught one and cannot figure out what it is.
Signature: Kate

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Kate,
You would probably also get mad if someone trapped you under glass and wouldn’t let you free.  This is a harmless male Valley Carpenter Bee.  Male bees cannot sting.  The sexually dimorphic black female Valley Carpenter Bee is capable of stinging, but seldom does.

Thank you!
I let it go after about 15 minutes. Such a fascinating creature!
Kate Russell

We are glad to hear that Kate.  Though they cannot sting, male Valley Carpenter Bees seem more aggressive as they defend territory.  They are also much more wary when they fly.  Female Valley Carpenter Bees are more lumbering in their flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Plague of red flying insects
Location: San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic
March 14, 2016 7:15 pm
Help! I have a plague of these red beetley insects coming into my new apartment. There are about 30+ that have entered. They fly and they seem drawn to people. I live in the Dominican Republic in a new apartment building surrounded by sugarcane farms. It’s sugar cane harvest season right now and they’re burning a lot of the fields. Help! I need to know how to keep them out of my house!
Signature: Grace

St Andrews Cotton Stainer

St Andrews Cotton Stainer

Hi Grace,
This is a St Andrews Cotton Stainer,
Dysdercus andreae, and you can find out more information on American Insects where it states:  “In the West Indies this species develops on the seeds of the Portia tree (Thespesia populnea), a member of the mallow family that grows along the shoreline. The bugs can also develop on cotton, and in fact Dr. Harold Grau and his associates at Christopher Newport University have demonstrated that the species grows larger on cotton than on Thespesia populnea.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Robberfly
Location: 36°42’57.27″N 29°14’9.57″E
March 13, 2016 9:05 am
Seen in Turkey last summer. Quite high up (maybe 900m) in a pine forest about 20km inland in SW Turkey near Fethiye. The largest robberfly I have ever seen with a body which must be 40mm long at least. Beautiful looking beastie. You can clearly see the left haltere under the wing in this photo. Despite a lot of googling I am no closer to getting a scientific name for it.
Signature: Sean Stevenson

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Dear Sean,
Your request arrived while we were out of the office, traveling with Journalism students to NYC.  Your Robber Fly looks very much like this image taken in Italy that is posted on the Diptera Info forum that is identified as being in one of the genera “
Tolmerus/Machimus sp. It is a female of a group of very hard to id species.”

Yes, that looks about right-thanks very much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this
Location: Dragon run river/swamp near Saluda, Virginia
March 13, 2016 5:50 am
Hi, hoping you can tell me about this bug found this morning in the house.
We live in Virginia, near Saluda, near the dragon run River/swamp. Found early morning on 13 March 2016. We are very wooded and rural.
Signature: James

False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Hi James,
We are currently scrolling through unanswered mail from March, searching for nice images and postings that may be of interest to our readership.  This is a False Bombardier Beetle in the genus
Galerita.  According to BugGuide:  “Open woodlands, under stones, leaves. Come to lights, sometimes wander into houses” and “Adults eat other insects, especially caterpillars.”

Daniel,
Thank you for the response and information.  I have bookmarked the ‘bug guide’ website.  Should prove useful in the future.
Thanks again,
James

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Napier, Western Cape, South Africa
March 10, 2016 9:38 am
Daniel
I found the camouflaged insect this morning (Thursday 10 March) by accident (first JPG) – if it hadn’t moved to avoid my hosepipe I would not have seen it. About 1cm long, and keeping very still among the autumn leaf litter … we’ve had this property since end 2003, and this is the first time I’ve seen anything like it. …
Thanks
Signature: Johann van der Merwe

What's That Bug?

What’s That Bug?

Hi Again Johann,
We split your request into two postings.  We have no idea what this camouflaged insect is, but we are relatively certain it is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera.  We are going to throw this out as a challenge to our readership to assist in its identification.

Daniel
Thank you for all the trouble you take in identifying these insects – it is appreciated.
Regards
Johann

Karl Identifies the Spiny Bug.
Hi Daniel and Johann:
It looks like a Coreid bug in the genus Pephricus (Coreidae: Coreinae: Phyllomorphini). The common name may be Spiny Bug, which would certainly make sense. Regards.
Karl

Wow.  Thanks so much Karl.  We never would have guessed that this Spiny Bug was in the family Coreidae.

Karl
You are spot on … what I found is undoubtedly a Pephricus Coreidae.
As Len de Beer said, a leaf mimic with amazing spines.
Thank you very much.
Regards
Johann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Napier, Western Cape, South Africa
March 10, 2016 9:38 am
Daniel
… The second JPG is of a moth my wife found in the kitchen – again, a first for us. With that colouring we would (should) have noticed it if it’s a local species.
Thanks
Johann
Signature: Johann van der Merwe

Arctiid Moth

Arctiid Moth

Dear Johann,
We are going back through unanswered mail from March in an attempt to post some submissions our readers may enjoy.  This pretty little Arctiid Moth is in the genus
Utetheisa, and it is native to your area.  There are several nice images on iSpot.  The genus is not limited to South Africa.  We even have a North American species which is documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination