From the monthly archives: "February 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: HELP!!!
Location: Canton, OH
February 24, 2016 11:59 am
I have now found 2 piles of these mysterious seeds in various piles of clothing. I cannot for the life of me figure out exactly what it is and how they appeared. They’re mostly flat, semi-shiny, light to medium brown, and slightly pointed at one end. I’ve google searched to my whits end but absolutely nothing looks like these….flax seed-looking…droppings? I have NO idea but a few days after I found this pile, the entire pile was gone. GONE. As in disappeared. I’m not kidding!! Help!
Signature: Scared and Alone In Home

Rodent's Seed Stash

Rodent’s Seed Stash

Dear Scared and Alone in Home,
Though we cannot tell you what kind of seeds you found, we are very confident that they were put there by a rodent.  Mice will frequently gather seeds and provision them indoors where conditions are comfortable, but where food is scarce.  We have several postings of Poke Seeds found indoors, but your seeds are different.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s not a horsefly
Location: Palm Desert, California
February 24, 2016 11:03 pm
I found this on my porch in Palm Desert, California earlier today. I have seen hundreds of horseflies and this was much much bigger and the legs are thicker. It’s not a roach. Almost looks like a cross between a horsefly and a cockroach ! Any idea???
Signature: Aimee

Female Valley Carpenter Bee

Female Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Aimee,
This is a female Carpenter Bee in the genus
Xylocopa, most likely a Valley Carpenter Bee, Xylocopa varipuncta.  Interestingly, another member of the genus with clearer wings and a striped abdomen, Xylocopa tabaniformis, is known as the Horsefly-like Carpenter Bee, but according to BugGuide, it is only reported from Texas.  The Valley Carpenter Bee is a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism, meaning males and females are very different in appearance.  Females are black and males are golden.  We we in the garden at dusk last night and heard a loud buzzing.  We saw our first male Valley Carpenter Bee of the year.  Males are short lived and seem to appear only in spring.  Females that need to tunnel a nest in dead wood and then provision the nest with pollen for the larvae have a much longer life span.

Thank you!!! About 15 people told me it was a horsefly and I knew it wasn’t! Yay I win! Thanks to you!! I appreciate it!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful… Moth?
Location: 7°53’11.6″N 72°29’46.7″W
February 24, 2016 10:47 am
I was traveling in Cucuta, Colombia and noticed this interesting looking insect in the elevator with me. I would estimate the round silver piece of metal next to the bug is about 1.5″ diameter.
Signature: Matt

Tiger Moth: Histioea meldolae

Tiger Moth: Histioea meldolae

Dear Matt,
This gorgeous wasp mimic Tiger Moth is most likely
Histioea meldolae or another member of the genus based on a posting from our own archives submitted by Karl and confirmed by Arctiid expert Julian Donahue.  There is also a nice image on Hanna’s Bananas.

Thanks Daniel for the knowledge and the quick turnaround on my photo.  I appreciate it!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow moth with clear spots on wings
Location: Arlington, Virginia
February 23, 2016 11:30 am
I found this moth last summer in Virginia. Very small, about a 1.5-2 inch wingspan. Spots on wings are transparent. Love your site. Thanks.
Signature: Dan

Yellow Moth

The Beggar

Dear Dan,
We did a quick search and did not turn up an identity, but we feel confident that one of our readers may have better luck before we can return to this research.

Thanks for checking. I have been looking at pictures of moths for the past year and I still can’t figure it out. Oh well!

Update:  The Beggar
Thanks to a comment from Ben, we didn’t have to research the identity of this lovely moth any longer.  It is The Beggar,
Eubaphe mendica, and according to BugGuide:  “This is not a typical geometer in appearance, at least.”   That might explain the difficulty we had on our first attempt at identification and why this has troubled Dan for a year.

Thank you so much Ben and WTB 🙂 I can now sleep at night.

We surmise that will be some relief after a year of deprivation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: is this a moth caterpillar
Location: Pike Lake, near Perth Ontario
February 21, 2016 3:11 pm
photographed July 15, 2015 close to the ground near Perth Ontario
approx. 2″ in length
what species?
Signature: dalep

Spider with Web

Spider with Web

Dear dalep,
We cannot locate a Caterpillar in the image you provided, however there is what appears to be a Spider resting at the lower left hand point of the structure that appears in your image.  We are speculating that the structure is either a series of egg sacs or part of the web where prey has been snared.  We are going to continue to research the identity of this spider.  We believe this might be a Trashline Orbweaver that Eric Eaton profiled on Bug Eric.  Here is an image from BugGuide of
Cyclosa turbinata.  According to BugGuide, another member of the genus Cyclosa conica, is found in your area.

Spider with Web

Spider with Web

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black beetle with Red and Yellow Markings
Location: Tortuguero, Costa Rica
February 22, 2016 11:01 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman! I hope you can help me. I have a picture of a beetle that I couldn’t identify. I took this picture while at Turtle Beach Lodge in Tortuguero. Please see picture attached.
Thank you!
Signature: Lise Leger

Heliconia Bug

Heliconia Bug

Dear Lise,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Leaf Footed Bug or Big Legged Bug in the family Coreidae.  We found it identified as
Leptoscelis tricolor on Nature Close Ups and the identification is accompanied by several citations.  The site states:  “This coreid is commonly known as the heliconia bug simply because it’s often found feeding on heliconias.”  Featured Creatures also has images of immature stages and provides this fascinating information:  “Male Leptoscelis tricolor defend territories on heliconia inflorescences. When two males encounter one another, one male usually begins twitching his front legs up and down. If the competition continues to escalate, the second male will also begin twitching his front legs up and down. The two males turn around, end-to-end, and wrap their hind legs around one another. Short squeezing bursts may then be observed, with the spines of one or both of the male’s legs pressing into the abdomen of the opponent. Squeezing may continue for some time, and males will even continue to wrestle if they fall off the host plant.”

Wow!  Thank you for the quick response.  No wonder I couldn’t find it in the beetles pictures.  And yes, that is very interesting information indeed.  Wrestlers!  How funny.
Thanks again!
Lise

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination