From the monthly archives: "February 2016"

Subject: Moth identification
Location: Between Port Kenny and Streaky Bay SA
February 28, 2016 4:10 am
Can you tell me what this moth is seen in SA?
Thanks
Signature: Jack Ritchie

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Jack,
This is NOT a moth.  It is an Antlion, and we believe it might be
Heoclisis fundata based on images posted to the Atlas of Living Australia.

Thanks Daniel
We saw it at Murphy’s haystacks on one of the rocks. I note in the atlas that there aren’t recorded sightings of them in that area.
Thanks so much for what you do. Brilliant
Talk soon
Jack

Leap Day Posting UpdateJust as we decided to to change the status of this posting, we realized another possibility.  Might Rhinoceros Beetles hibernate if they don’t mate or if they emerge late in the season?   

Subject: large “horned” beetle
Location: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
February 28, 2016 8:23 am
Hi, I just found these beetles in the rotted out center of an old (100+ yrs.) dead red oak tree stump in New Market, Virginia. I was mixing dirt into the compost-like material when I found them. Their bodies are appx. 2 1/2 inches long. At first I thought I was looking at a bug with vertical pinchers but then I realized that only the bottom one moved. They have two smaller “horns” on either side of the large one. I think their eyes are down near where the lower pincher meets the body. Can you tell me anything about these beetles?
Signature: Steve N.

Male Eastern Hercules Beetles

Male Eastern Hercules Beetles

Dear Steve,
What a marvelous discovery you have made.  These are male Eastern Hercules Beetles,
Dynastes tityus, the heaviest species of beetle found in North America.  Immature grubs are found in rotting wood.  Adults normally appear in summer, with most sightings occurring in July.  We are guessing that unusual weather is causing emergence schedules of insects to change.  We suspect these two guys completed metamorphosis and perhaps they are waiting for ideal conditions to emerge from the rotting stump to mate and reproduce.

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Subject: Painted Lady?
Location: Cuernavaca, Mexico, alt: 1580 m
February 25, 2016 9:45 pm
Hi, I’m hoping you can help me again.
All three of the photos below were taken in October 2014, in the same plant in Cuernavaca, Mexico (altitude 1580 m). Those caterpillars were all over that plant for several seasons, until eventually there were enough to kill it. The butterflies are also very common. We believe they’re the same species, but obviously are not 100% sure.
From the caterpillar I thought a Painted Lady or Red Admiral, but the chrysalis and butterfly don’t match.
Thanks for any help you can provide.
Signature: Peculiarist

White Rayed Patch

White Rayed Patch

Dear Peculiarist,
This lovely little Brush Footed Butterfly is a White Rayed Patch,
Chlosyne ehrenbergii, which we identified on Learn About Butterflies where it states:  “The eggs are pale yellow in colour, and laid in batches of up to 200, on the underside of leaves of the foodplant, Buddleia.”  We believe the leaves in your images are of butterfly bush or Buddleia, so the caterpillar and chrysalides are most likely the immature stages of the White Rayed Patch.  We will check with Keith Wolfe for verification as we cannot seem to locate images of the immature stages, though the appearance of the caterpillar and chrysalides are consistent with other members of the genus.

Chrysalides of a White Rayed Patch

Chrysalides of a White Rayed Patch

Keith Wolfe verifies Chrysalis and Imago, but questions Caterpillar
Hola Daniel,
Would you please ask “Peculiarist” to kindly send me (OK to share my email address) ONLY the caterpillar photo at FULL size?  The pupae look good for C. ehrenbergii, but the larva appears a little different.  Muchas gracias!
Saludos,
Keith

Caterpillar of a White Rayed Patch

Caterpillar of a White Rayed Patch

Peculiarist Corrects Attachments
Hi Daniel,
As I was updating my page I noticed that this is the same caterpillar I sent before (my photo folders are a bit of a mess, and I had this duplicated in another folder), that was tentatively identified as a Pine Moth caterpillar. They do look alike, but I think with the extra information you have in these three photos White-rayed Patch is a more likely match. The food tree matches.
Thanks for your help, and I’ll be more careful in sending the most complete information I can in the future.
James

Keith Wolfe supplies some links.
Buenas noches James and Daniel,
Muchas gracias for the corroborating larval image.  Being endemic to Mexico, life-history photos of “Mariposa parche negra” are difficult to find online, so here are some examples . . .
Eggs > http://static.inaturalist.org/photos/1425291/large.jpg
Young cats > http://static.inaturalist.org/photos/2065941/large.jpg
Midsize cats > https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/11138108_765723383556971_4136080445991029828_n.jpg?oh=700346af33d15330a4f48de964ad98ed&oe=5756EA21
Mature cat > http://lh3.ggpht.com/NPtIzQX0McHT9D-BdUFwuXNz6U14-xNAXmrVI-ouMnGlXZFSR67Gj29RsDEYXVcrBkWFhXpHvMEhLlz6UbAX=s1200
Chrysalises > https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/v/t1.0-9/1920361_696343820407963_1558468250_n.jpg?oh=c6b7a068d1e9f21e960bc0fd521aad08&oe=575DEF8D
Hostplant > http://lh4.ggpht.com/YeXdxZfu6nyU4EpfKorYTOGjzDrarIGaHwdnujnAIsA_nDLoS8nlcel9FK7zsTlY0ohON_masMW0py-53XowBQ=s1200
Adults > http://butterfliesofamerica.com/chlosyne_ehrenbergii_live1.htm
Mil felicidades,
Keith

Subject: What is this fascinating critter?
Location: Gold Canyon, AZ
February 25, 2016 5:46 pm
Wandered into our camp in Gold Canyon, AZ. Anyone know what this is?
Signature: Deirdre

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Deirdre,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we need additional time to determine its identity.  We have written to Eric Eaton for assistance.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Yes, it is Megacyllene antennata.  Here’s a link:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/29440
Thanks for sharing!
Eric

Ed. Note:
According to BugGuide, the food plants for the southwestern species are:  “mesquite and (catclaw?)”

Subject: Pretty sure this is a bug egg…?
Location: Seattle
February 25, 2016 5:05 pm
I live near Seattle. For Christmas, we received a wicker picnic basket, and because because it was winter, we left the basket on the carpet in a room we don’t typically use. The room doesn’t receive much sunlight and typically is a little cooler than the rest of house, since it is a daylight basement.
A few weeks ago I decided to clean it up and wash the utensils that come with the basket, when I found these little white spheres in multiple spots in the basket. In addition, when I picked up the basket I saw the same white spheres sitting in clumps on the carpet, which I’ve photographed (and since vacuumed).
I took the basket, did a quick wipe and set it on a chair in the dining room. Within a week or two, I started seeing more of those same dots on the chair. Any ideas what they are? I think they are bugs, but haven’t seen any evidence of any bugs. I presume I should probably throw the basket away…
Signature: some guy

Growth on Basket

Growth on Basket

Dear some guy,
Despite the high resolution of your image, we don’t quite know what we are looking at, but we do not believe it to be insect related.  Our first impulse is to suspect this might be some type of fungus.  Damp conditions in Seattle could cause fungus to grow in some unlikely spots.  Moving the basket from the room to the chair would transfer the spores and cause a fungus to grow there as well.  Perhaps one of our readers will have a better suggestion.

Growth on Basket

Growth on Basket

Subject: ?
Location: na
February 24, 2016 7:24 am
today i fand a spider in my shawer and it is werd looking
can you tell me what tipe of spider it is?
it is blake and whate
Signature: na

Spider

Spider

Dear na,
There is not enough detail in your images for us to provide an identification.

Spider

Spider