From the monthly archives: "January 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug in Belize
Location: near San Ignacio, Belize
January 25, 2016 4:06 am
Hi,
I saw this bug while in Belize last november. I was walking through the jungle at night near the town of San Ignacio. It is about 5 centimeters long en was sitting on a plant hanging over water. No idea what it is. Hope you can tell me! Thanks!
Signature: Susan

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Susan,
Though you found it in the jungle, this Centipede is a member of the order Scutigeromorpha and that orders members are commonly called House Centipedes.  We haven’t the necessary skills to identify your species, but there is an introduced species,
Scutigera coleoptrata, found in North America that has adapted quite well to living in homes where it helps to keep populations of undesirable insects and arthropods in check.  Of that species, BugGuide notes:  “Mostly encountered indoors in damp areas such as bathrooms, cellars, and crawl spaces. It will venture beyond these areas and is often seen quickly scurrying across floors or climbing a wall.  Outdoors, they live under logs, rocks, and similar moist protected places.”  It is our understanding that in some parts of the world, House Centipedes are found in caves.  Your individual on a branch is quite unusual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful Bug
Location: richmond heights ohio
January 24, 2016 10:17 pm
On the bed, January, in Ohio,
Should I be looking for exterminator?
Signature: letter?

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

In our opinion, in this case an exterminator is a waste of money.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs like the one in your image are native to the Pacific Northwest, but in the 1960s, perhaps due to a major increase in travel, the species greatly expanded its range, now being found in most of North America and most recently being reported from Europe as well.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs frequently enter homes to hibernate when the weather cools.  They will not damage your home or its furnishings and they pose no threat to you or your pets.  They can be an annoyance if they enter homes in great numbers, but they are not breeding indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink Beetle
Location: Juiz de Fora-MG – BRAZIL
January 24, 2016 8:24 am
Good afternoom Mr. Bugman! Recently I found this lovely pink beetle in the woods of the municipality of Simão Pereira-MG (Brazil) . I’ve never seen equal with this color! Do you who is the beetle? Thanks so much.
Signature: Marcelo Brito de Avellar

Flea Beetle

Flea Beetle

Dear Marcelo,
We are certain this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, and we are relatively certain it is a Flea Beetle in the subfamily Alticini.  This is verified on Nature Closeups where a very similar looking Flea Beetle from Brazil is pictured, but not identified to the species level.  Nature and More has a similar image identified as
Homophoita sp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Comment:  After reading the first three comments that arrived, we decided to upgrade this posting to the Nasty Reader tag.

Subject: Comments, Responses, & Sad Backpedaling
January 24, 2016 4:35 am
Hello,
I am a biologist and I work for the Government. I mention this only to reveal my familiarity with reading disturbing and mysterious things. I have been on your site several times hoping to see something interesting. Tonight I did, though not topically expected.  Areas now perfectly clear are:
1)  Nothing here of more knowledge or with  more information than a public high school text book.
2) That you care.
3)You attempt to deflect this by mockery and  wildly unwarranted superiority.
4) That this site does more than babysit its curator’s undernourished egos.
On reading a post , a  schoolyard comment  from another reader, your curiously condescending and marginalizing reply, the rebuke  .. and wait for it…the transparent cowardice of your denial. Perhaps you overlooked a small detail. Tiny detail really..its just that you  typed words on the page.   Hands in pockets and  think  words really, really hard next time? Just a thought.
It’s not too late for this to morph into a catalyst for positive change. Love yourself a little more and understand that cruelty is a game played in shallow water.  Ultimately you will lose. The rest of us can clearly see your feet.
Peace.
Out.
Signature: Amanda

Dear Amanda,
We do consider this website and our life both to be works in progress and we like to think that we have evolved considerably since we first began writing What’s That Bug? in 1998.  From the very beginning, we have maintained that we have no credentials to provide scientific information and we have always strived for our site to be a pop culture site that is accessible to the average person rather than to be a true scientific endeavor targeting intellectual specialists.  That there is “nothing here of more knowledge or with more information than a public high school text book” is not a problem in our mind because there is no requirement that the web browsing public possesses a college degree.  Many children visit our site and a high school text book would be quite educational.  Out of concern for younger readers, we try our best to keep a clean site, so we do not use vulgar language. 

We always defer to true experts, so we question your allegations of our “wildly unwarranted superiority.”  With that stated, your comment has us a bit confused.  There is some praise there, but it is overshadowed by your criticism of our editorial stance.  We are well aware that once content enters cyberspace, it gains a life of its own and it is nearly impossible to rescind, so we actually do carefully consider our words prior to hitting the publish button.  We are not infallible and we do not apologize for our ego.  It can be argued that anyone who enters public life in any way, be it running a blog or running for public office, has an inflated ego. 

Your comment seems to refer to a specific posting with “a schoolyard comment from another reader” and our “transparent cowardice” and what you perceive as “cruelty” on our part, but without a real citation to correspond to your criticism on how we have chosen to run our own public site, we can neither justify our stance nor clarify or defend the meaning of what we have written.  Clearly your background in biology and your position as a government employee has prepared to to analyze our psyche.  In our opinion, your focus on our use of occasional sarcasm vastly overshadows the public service we provide free of charge.

Elise from Facebook Comments.
January 24 at 6:21pm
Love your page, and appreciate that you tried to interpret that sometimes incoherent comment. The poster seems to lack both a sense of humor and a mastery of basic sentence structure. Keep doing what you do.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Los Angeles County Rain Beeltes
Location: Sanberg area, Los Angeles County, CA USA
January 23, 2016 6:43 pm
Here are some pictures of the Beautiful Pleocoma badia hirsuta males that Joe and I collected near Sanberg, Los Angeles County, CA with Black lite vein traps from 5:00 am to 6:45am on Jan. 14 and 15 , 2016 . Scattered rain 52 degrees with soaking wet ground . We tried to find some female Pleocoma …..but, as usual they were Hiding very well from us. One of these days … Gene St. Denis -Sierra Nevada Research – South Lake Tahoe
Signature: Gene St. Denis

Rain Beetle

Rain Beetle

Hi Again Gene,
Thanks for providing us with your latest Rain Beetle images as well as providing the conditions surrounding the collection. 

Rain Beetle

Rain Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Is This Totally Nasty Thing??!!
Location: 10933 Gilbert Drive, Beaumont, Texas 77705
January 23, 2016 1:55 pm
My husband found this thing, the nastiest looking thing ever on this planet, this morning (Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016) on our back porch here in Fannett, Texas. Our exact address for GPS purposes is 10933 Gilbert Drive, Beaumont, Texas 77705. NASTY!!
Signature: Kathi and Richard Orgeron

Grub

Grub

Dear Kathi and Richard,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, but we have never seen one so blue.  We are not certain of the species, but we suspect it belongs to a Rhinoceros Beetle in the subfamily Dynastinae.  Members of this family include some of the largest beetles in the world, including the heaviest North American beetle, the Eastern Hercules Beetle that is found in Texas.  Here is a BugGuide image of the grub of an Eastern Hercules Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae live in rotting heartwood of logs and stumps, particularly hardwoods, but sometimes pine.”  We are uncertain why you found this grub on your porch, but if someone was splitting firewood, or if firewood is stored on the back porch, the appearance may be connect to the wood.

Grub

Grub

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination