From the monthly archives: "January 2016"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hairy wasp
Location: Gulf Shores, AL
January 28, 2016 7:59 am
We found this wasp under some lantana while we were weeding the garden. It was already dead and laying in the leaf litter. It appears to have long “hairs” that grew all over its body. Can you tell us what kind of wasp this is?
Found is Gulf Shores, AL. on 1/28/16
Signature: Gulf State Park

Paper Wasp covered in Fungus

Paper Wasp covered in Fungus

This is a Paper Wasp and it is being “devoured” by Fungus.  Many living insects are attacked by Fungus and they eventually die.  Dead insects in damp locations might also be broken down by Fungus.  This BugGuide image identifies the Cordyceps fungus.

Thank you so much for the quick reply. I thought it was just a normal paper wasp, but I had never seen anything quite like that! I thought that it maybe had roots growing out of it.  Thank you again!
Thanks,
Kelly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biting ghost
Location: NC
January 26, 2016 9:10 pm
We have been being stung by what looks like hair. Even our dogs have red spots on them. They are also getting a lot of ear problems. I find a lot of what looks like leaf litter on the floors and it always has hair with it. The last picture I had to get it off my dogs eye one morning. I almost looked like some kind of slug with a soft shell. I wonder if something is using the leaf as a hiding place.
Signature: Lost in the woods

"Hair Bug"

“Hair Bug”

Dear Lost in the woods,
Much like your previous submission, we cannot recognize any life form in your images.  This looks like debris picked up from the floor.  We cannot help you but you may benefit from the network of sufferers who share parasite information in our comment section.  For the record, we do not endorse any methods described in comments.

"Hair Bug"

“Hair Bug”

"Hair Bug"

“Hair Bug”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar identification.
Location: El Paso county colorado manitou spring 80829
January 27, 2016 11:26 am
I have posted this picture to many websites and know one can Identify it here is the information on it. I am in El Paso county colorado manitou spring at 8000 feet. I found it crawling on the rocks I do not know the host. It was August 16 2015.
Signature: Zack vogel

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Dear Zack,
This is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are having a problem with its species identity.  We scoured BugGuide and we found an image of
Hypocrisias minima posted to BugGuide that is the closest match, but we are not satisfied that is a correct ID.  The Caterpillar of the Virginia Ctenucha pictured on BugGuide also looks similar, and it is reported from Colorado, but again, it does not look like an ideal match.  This Tiger Moth Caterpillar from Colorado posted to the Life of Your Time blog is also somewhat similar.  We are going to contact Julian Donahue, a Lepidopterist specializing in Arctiids in the hope he can provide some information.

Julian Donahue Responds
 The caterpillar may just be a color form of Pyrrharctia isabella, the “standard” woolly bear.
I suggest you contact the caterpillar guy, David Wagner at Univ. of Conn., who is publishing books on the subject.
Julian

David Wagner Responds
I am not sure I have seen it before and am very, very intrigued.
I am writing a book on caterpillars of western North America and I don’t think I have seen this one before.  It is possible it is the very rare Alexicles aspersa.  If not something in the genus Hypercompe.
Was the individual saved?  I would be quite interested in learning more about the elevation and location, and especially altitude of the capture.
Thanks for sharing.
David L. Wagner Professor
University of Connecticut

Thanks for the information Dave.
I run the pop culture website What’s That Bug? and the photo was sent to my site.
I will write back and request additional information and get back to you.
Daniel Marlos

Zack Responds
Unfortunately I did not save it because I did not want it to starve. I am around 7500 in Crystal park Manitou Springs Colorado In a mountain community. The mountain Is covered in pine, fer and blue spruce with large spots of Scrub Oak. It get up to the 90 degree weather in the summer time and get down to the 4 degrees and lower in the winter. Thank you if you need more in formation please let me know and can I have David Wagner email in case he whats to talk to me.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this spider?
Location: Mwandi, South Zambia
January 27, 2016 3:56 am
Hello bug people,
On a trip to Zambia in July last year, we encountered a phat spidr in the small town of Mwandi in Southern Zambia. We were wondering if you could identify it for us, we think it may be a wolf spider. Thanks very much.
Signature: Phat Spyda

Probably Wolf Spider

Probably Wolf Spider

Dear Phat Spyda,
We believe you are correct that this is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae, but a dorsal view or a close-up of the eyes would aid in identification.  Your individual looks similar to this Wolf Spider from iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Sydney australia
January 26, 2016 10:29 pm
I was bitten/stung by this not long ago in Sydney and was wondering what it is and what issues that come with the bite if any hurt like hell at the time has settled not buy is still painful 20 mins later. As u can see in the photos 3 stings in a row across a short area
Signature: Thanks Mark

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Dear Mark,
This is an Assassin Bug and its aposomatic or warning coloration is appropriate.  There is not enough detail in your image to make a definite species ID.  This might be a Ground Assassin Bug, but a quick glance at Brisbane Insects reveals that there are many red and black Assassin Bugs in Australia.  Your individual appears to be wingless, and it might be a wingless species or it might be an immature nymph.  Some species of Assassin Bugs are more inclined to bite than others, and Assassin Bugs in the genus
Triatoma, known as Kissing Bugs, feed on the blood of warm blooded creatures, including humans.

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identity
Location: Nova Scotia Canada
January 27, 2016 9:12 am
We have found 5 of these in our house …Please help us identify what it is …Thank you
Signature: Paula Hurley

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Paula,
Do you have firewood in the house?  We believe this Wood Wasp and its coevals emerged from firewood because their normal development was accelerated due to the heat indoors.  Your individual is most likely in the genus
Xiphydria, and because of its dark antennae, it most closely resembles the images of Xiphydria tibialis posted to BugGuide.

Yes we do…Thank you very much my husband thought it looked like a form of a wasp..hope they don’t sting …thank you so much for the quick response 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination