From the monthly archives: "December 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Royal Moth?
Location: Panama, Central America
December 17, 2015 9:37 pm
Can you identify this moth., about 4″ wing span. In Boquete Panama, elev 4500’… Tropical cloud forest. Thx!
Signature: Curious clare

Automeris hamata

Automeris hamata

Dear Curious Clare,
This is not a Royal Moth, but a Giant Silkmoth in the subfamily Hemileucinae, known as the Buck and Io Moth family in North America.  We believe we have correctly identified your moth as
Automeris hamata on the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site, a member’s only site, and it is also pictured on the Fauna of Paraguay site.  Many members of the genus have pronounced eyespots on the underwings that are hidden when the moth is at rest, but revealed if the moth is disturbed by a predator.  A bird thinking it might be about to eat a tasty moth would be surprised into perceiving a potentially larger predator with enormous eyes, providing a defense mechanism for the moth.  We will check with Bill Oehlke to verify our identification as there are many similar looking members of the genus. We suspect Bill may request permission to post your images on his site as well, and we hope you provide that permission.

Automeris hamata

Automeris hamata

Yes, that is hamata.
Thanks for thinking of me. Would be great to get the date.
Bill

Daniel, thank you! This is so cool to have a resource such as yours ….I scanned and scanned sites but could find no exact match so thanks again. Of course, Bill may use the photos …no credit necessary.
Happy Holidays!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle
Location: Dominican Repulic
December 18, 2015 6:27 am
I took this picture of this very interesting looking beetle. I wonder if you can help me identify it.
Signature: Chris

Hieroglyphic Moth

Hieroglyphic Moth

Dear Chris,
This lovely little Owlet Moth,
Diphthera festiva, is commonly called a Hieroglyphic Moth because of the complex pattern on its wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this
Location: Sydney
December 17, 2015 12:57 am
Just wanna know what bug is this I’ve never seen before
Signature: How ever

Plague Soldier Beetles

Plague Soldier Beetles

These are Plague Soldier Beetles in the genus Chauliognathus.  Despite the common name, they are not considered a threat to the plants, though large numbers might be considered a nuisance.  They are frequently found on flowering gum or eucalyptus trees because of the abundance of pollen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help to name this bug
Location: Lantua Island, Hong Kong SAR, China
December 17, 2015 7:15 am
Hi,
Could you please help to identify that bug? It’s really rare to me. Thanks a lot!
Signature: Jackson Liu

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Dear Jackson,
This appears to be a Phasmid, commonly called a Walkingstick or Stick Insect.  We were not able to locate a species name for you.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide additional information.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks a lot. I once thought it to be walkingstick alike, while I am not quite familiar with their common feature. I am more clear now. Really thanks! 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: eggs on cedar tree
Location: north alabama
December 16, 2015 10:00 am
approx 3 inches accross found on limb of small cedar tree. Probably deposited sometime in October.
Signature: Olin

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Dear Olin,
This Gall is an abnormal growth on a plant, and though many Galls are produced by insects, this Cedar Apple Rust Gall is caused by the fungus
Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae.  According to the University of Minnesota Integrated Pest Management for home apple growers page:  “Cedar-apple rust is a fungal disease that spends half of its life cycle infecting apple or crab apple trees, and the other half infecting Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) or other species of juniper (Juniperus sp.). This disease can cause damage to leaves and fruit of very susceptible apple varieties, but is only a minor problem on resistant or partially resistant trees.”  According to the Jack Schmidling Productions, Inc. site, your image:  ” is the gall that appears on the Cedar tree in late Winter. When this gall gets wet from Spring rains, the jelly masses emerge from the pores to ripen the spores. When the jelly dries, the spores are carried by the wind to apple trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Suspected parasite
Location: Barcelona
December 14, 2015 3:55 pm
Hello, can you help me find the name of this strange looking thing in my 5yr olds stools? He’s had strong stomach pain since November 28 and pediatrician seems to think its just roughage and that he just has oxymorons. It measures about 1cm or more, has a forked tail and it seems to have 2 teeth like structures at the front. He’s been treated with lomper but stomach pain persists still today. Now he’s also getting itchy pimple like button with center. Not sure if that’s just chicken pox or associated with that parasite. My husband travelled about month ago to Eritrea. Not sure if has any connection or if this thing is local.
Grateful for any info you can provide me with.
Regards.
Signature: Worried mom

Possible Parasite

Possible Parasite

Dear Worried Mom,
We empathize with your situation, but we haven’t the medical credentials to diagnose this alleged internal parasite.  While we refrain from providing any medical advice in similar situations, we have a robust community of sufferers who freely share home remedies.  We must clarify that we accept no responsibility for side effects of ingesting kerosene or any other cures that are provided in our comment section.

Possible Parasite

Possible Parasite

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination