From the monthly archives: "November 2015"

Subject: Kissing bug? Leptoglossus species?
Location: WV, USA
November 24, 2015 4:52 am
I found this bug in my laundry basket on my bed ?. It is November in the eastern panhandle of WV and the cold weather has moved in. The picture is magnified and I would guess the bug was 1/2 cm long. It resembles the kissing bug as well as leptoglossus bugs however, neither of those have the exact markings that this bug has not do they have a pointed “butt” like this one. I’m a bit freaked out as I have a 6 weeks old who sleeps with me as well as a 2 year old in the home! HELP!
Signature: Jenna Gainey

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear Jenna,
This is neither a Kissing Bug nor a
Leptoglossus species.  It is a Lacewing Larva, AKA Aphid Wolf, and it is considered a beneficial species as it helps to control populations of Aphids and other plant feeding species in the garden.  We do receive reports of bites from Lacewing Larvae, but the bite is not considered dangerous, producing only local redness and itching.

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: On bushes and on the walls(outside)
November 22, 2015 8:52 pm
Hello bug man:
I found this at home here in Florida and I have no idea what is it. There’s a lot of them in my bushes and on the walls and they are eating the leaves. They are destroying my bushes. What should I do?
Signature: By email

Bagworm

Bagworm

This is a Bagworm, the larva of a moth in the family Psychidae. Here is a matching image from BugGuide.   According to BugGuide:  “Larvae (bagworms) construct elaborate little cases around themselves of plant debris and other organic matter.”

Subject: What is this
Location: Pacific Palisades CA 90272
November 23, 2015 3:36 pm
Not sure if it is a drone bee or not. Found it in our yard
Pacific Palisades CA
Thanks
Nancy
Ps. Doing this on my phone. Hope the first picture is of it next to the ruler. Can’t see the image it’s so small
Signature: Nancy

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Male Valley Carpenter Bee

Dear Nancy,
Thanks for sending three images.  That gives us a choice of what to post.  We are posting the close-up of this male Valley Carpenter Bee.  The species has pronounced sexual dimorphism, and the golden males look like an entirely different species than the black female Valley Carpenter Bee.  The differences are most stunning when the sexes are viewed together, and if there is still any doubt that they are the same species, here is a mating pair of Valley Carpenter Bees.

Subject: What’s this beetle?
Location: Australia, Queensland, Brisbane
November 23, 2015 3:05 pm
I found a really cool beetle in my bedroom but could not find out what type of beetle it was and am trying to get it identified. Also the bug has been released.
Signature: By Nic

Prionid:  Sceleocantha pilosicollis

Prionid: Sceleocantha glabricollis

Dear Nic,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but more specifically it is a Prionid in the subfamily Prioninae.  At first we believed we had correctly identified the species as
Sceleocantha pilosicollis based on the image posted to Prioninae of the World.  Additional research on Atlas of Living Australia only lists the species in West Australia, so we decided to search other members of the genus.  We learned on Atlas of Living Australia that Sceleocantha glabricollis is listed in Queensland and the rest of Eastern Australia, so we believe it may the the correct species.  We would not rule out that we might be wrong, but the mandibles on the individual pictured on Prioninae of the World look quite similar to your specimen.  An image we located on FlickR is also a good visual match.

Prionid:  Sceleocantha pilosicollis

Prionid: Sceleocantha glabricollis

Subject: Another wierd Louisiana bug
Location: South Louisiana
November 23, 2015 11:11 am
Dear bug man,
I found this bug on my porch a few days ago. I was wondering if you would be able to identify what it is? It is a tan color and didn’t really move much even when I took the picture.
Signature: Curious

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Dear Curious,
The Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper,
Leptysma marginicollis, is a very distinctive species that “Inhabits wet areas, and is usually found on emergent vegetation such as cattails and sedges” according to Bugguide, which leads us to believe you live not far from a marsh or swamp.

Ed. Note:  We really want to answer this query, but we don’t know where to begin our research.  These appear to be some species of Tiger Moth.

Subject: Insect tipe
Location: Lawn
November 22, 2015 2:15 am
I have found this insect in my garden can you please help me to identify this insect?
Signature: Kobus slabbert

Moths

Moths

Where is your lawn?  New Jersey?  Cairo?  Sydney??????

I sory it is bela bela in South Africa
Groete

Moths

Moths

Thanks for providing a location.  Your images are not of the highest quality, but these appear to be diurnal moths.  We searched through the two most obvious groups:  the subfamily Agaristinae on iSpot, the tribe Ctenuchiini on iSpot and the family Zygaenidae also on iSpot, and though there were many similar moths, none had the combination of red head, red legs, dark wings and light spots that your individuals have.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with this ID.