From the monthly archives: "November 2015"

Subject: Unknown Beautiful Creey Crawly
Location: Forest Lake, MN
November 1, 2015 8:33 pm
Hey, Dan! I hope this finds you and your family doing well!
I was at a friends house today and they were splitting old Red Oak for the winter. We came across this beauty, burrowed what looked like about 4 inches into the tree trunk. It’s about 2 inches long. I’m sorry I didn’t get a photo of it when it came out of the hole eventually. I thought I got enough photos but I guess not. Do you have any idea what it could be? I usually check your site before I ask, but I don’t know if it’s larvae, pupae, or what. We are all dying to find out! I feel bad that it’s probably now going to die, but perhaps an opossum with find a tasty meal.
Signature: carpwoman

Beetle Grub

Beetle Grub

Dear Carpwoman,
This is some species of Beetle Grub, and we followed up on our initial suspicion that this might be the larva of an Eyed Elater, and we believe we are correct.  Images on both BugGuide and Bug Eric confirm our suspicions.  According to Bug Eric:  “Larvae of all Alaus species live in decaying wood where they prey on the larvae and pupae of other kinds of beetles.  These ginat ‘wireworms’ have strong jaws and should be handled carefully, if at all.”  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae in decaying hardwood or pine wood, esp. in decaying roots.  Food Larvae feed on larvae and pupae of various insects, esp. beetles.”  The much more commonly encountered adult form of the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click Beetle is a large beetle with false eyespots.

Thank you for such a speedy response!  It’s nice to see this beautiful grub would have (hopefully still will) turned into such a cool beetle.
Joanne

 

Subject: Argiope Avara Kauaiensis
Location: Kalalau Trail, Kauai, Hawaii
November 2, 2015 9:05 am
Hi There,
On a recent trip to Kauai, I spotted this giant orbweaver:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/markostavric/22090905323/lightbox
It seemed to have unique markings and I was unable to find much reference to it. Yours seems to be the only website I could find. It appears that you’ve identified it as Argiope Avara Kauaiensis. I wanted to share my picture of it. This one was found on the Kalalau Trail and seemed to be about 3.5 to 4 inches from toe to toe.
Signature: Marko

Orbweaver: Argiope avara kauaiensis

Orbweaver: Argiope avara kauaiensis

Dear Marko,
Thanks for providing our archives with a gorgeous image of this under-represented indigenous Hawaiian Orbweaver.

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Sikkim, India
October 27, 2015 3:00 am
These orange and black caterpillars were found aggregated on what i believe to be a magnolia tree
Signature: Richard Gunner

Caterpillar Aggregation

Caterpillar Aggregation

Dear Richard,
This is a beautiful image of some stunning Caterpillars, but alas, we have not been able to identify them. Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck while we are out of the office.

Subject: Please ID
Location: Sikkim, India
November 9, 2015 4:51 am
Black and white longitudinal stripes, orange bands, arch their backs when threatened
Signature: Richard Gunner

Dear Richard,
This image has been posted to our site since November 1.  We were not able to identify the caterpillars and no readers have written in with comments.  At this time, we are not able to provide you with an identification.

Subject: Moth / Bug Identification
Location: Kolkata, India
October 27, 2015 11:52 am
I saw this moth / bug in my house and it’s the FIRST time I have seen something like this in my country in all the 40 years I have lived. I’d be very grateful if you could identify it for me please.
Signature: Arjun

Hawkmoth

Hawkmoth

Dear Arjun,
This is a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, and we are struck by its resemblance to North American members of the genus
Xylophanes, pictured on BugGuide, including the Tersa Sphinx.  We learned on the India Biodiversity Portal that the genus is represented in India.  Additional research leads us to believe this is Theretra alecto which is pictured on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic.  A photo of Theretra alecto was selected as the first place winning photo from National Moth Week 2014 according the the National Moth Week blog.  We will be post-dating your submission to go live on our site on November 1 while we are away from the office.

Hawkmoth

Hawkmoth

Hello Daniel,
Thank you so so much for identifying this amazing insect. I am attaching some resized originals of this bug on this email. Please feel free to use them on your website.
Thanks and regards,
ARJUN.