From the monthly archives: "November 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful blue/black wasp
Location: Jamaica
November 29, 2015 9:58 pm
This looks like a Blue Flower Wasp (Scolia soror) which is native to Australia but I’m not sure because I saw it in Jamaica. It also looks similar to Blue Mud Wasp (Chalybion californicum) and Blue Mud Dauber (Chlorion aerarium) and even Great Black Wasp (Sphex pensylvanicus). It doesn’t appear to have a narrow waist from the photos I took. It is so beautiful – I want to post it on our website and would love to know the correct name before posting.
Thank you for your assistance!
Signature: Jean C

Flower Wasp

Flower Wasp

Dear Jean,
We agree with your initial impulse that this is a Flower Wasp in the family Scoliidae, and the Blue Flower Wasp that you cited is a member of a genus also found in the New World.  BugGuide lists five species in North America, and notes that there are seven species reported from North America.  The species on BugGuide that looks the most like your individual is 
Scolia mexicana, which is only listed from Arizona, but if its range extends into Mexico and Central America, it might actually be your species.  Alas, the best we are able to do is speculate that it is a Scolia species.

Flower Wasp

Flower Wasp

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your reply!  I really appreciate it.  I thought getting an answer was a long shot but figured it was worth a try. I feel more confident now that I at least know the species.
Jean

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Northern California foothills
November 29, 2015 5:18 pm
I live in the California Gold Country, halfway between Sacramento and Reno, NV. The elevation here is about 2500 ft. We have been in a prolonged drought, but have recently had a little bit of rain. I have lived in my house for 3 years and never seen these bugs before. About a month ago when the night time temperatures got cooler these bugs appeared on the sunny side of my house. The seem to enjoy sunning themselves but also seem undeterred by temperatures at or slightly below freezing. They particularly gather on window screens and windows. They fly or they run quickly when approached. The are about 1/2 to 1 inch in length and they have some red on their underside. They are very active during the day and I don’t see them after dark. They don’t seem to be doing any damage but there are a growing number of them and I am a bit concerned about them getting into my house and causing a problem. I have seen a few on my neighbor’s house but they seem to prefer my yellow house that gets a lot of sun. Oddly, my cat and dog who typically will play or catch bugs leave these guys alone. Any idea about what they are and should I be concerned? Thanks so much for your assistance.
Signature: Barbara

Western Boxelder Bug

Western Boxelder Bug

Hi Barbara,
This is a Western Boxelder Bug,
Boisea rubrolineata, and it is considered a benign creature though they are prone to forming large aggregations that can become a nuisance if they are plentiful or if they enter the home.  The behavior you describe is very common for the species.  When weather cools down, they will enter homes to hibernate, but they will not cause you or your home any damage.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much! Glad to know I can let them be without worrying that they are eating my home.  Have a wonderful day!
Barbara

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen one before in my life
Location: England
November 29, 2015 10:05 pm
This bug was on my leg and I took it off my leg and put it on some drawers and it only moved once and stood still for at least 10 minutes while I was looking at it.
Do you know what bug it is?
Thanks!
Signature: Josh

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Josh,
This is a blood-sucking Louse Fly or Ked, and they are frequently found near livestock, but they are opportunistic, and they will feed off humans if no livestock is available.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rhinoceros Beetle
Location: Delaware Watergap NJ
November 30, 2015 6:23 am
Hi Bug Man,
I know this adorable guy was a rhinoceros beetle the moment I saw him. However, I cannot find his exact species. All the images I can find do not have the same horn, his horn has three small nodes at the end.
Any idea??
Signature: Fern

Rhinoceros Beetle

Rhinoceros Beetle

Dear Fern,
We agree that this is a Rhinoceros Beetle, most likely Xyloryctes jamaicensis, though the bifurcated horn on your individual is quite curious and no individuals posted to BugGuide possess a similar horn.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he has an opinion.  Did you really see this beetle today?  Was the sighting at some other time of year?

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for the fast response!  The horn certainly confused me a little, as I haven’t been able to find a match for him.
This was late summer, maybe the last week of August.
Jennifern Hippely
Artist

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
Wondering if it is not just debris on the horn.  I found several specimens of the western species in New Mexico, and they often had caked soil on them from having dug out of the ground.
Eric

Thanks Daniel,
I’m sorry to trouble you over this.  Mine is certainly a match for the Americana Rhinoceros except for the horn anomaly!  Ha ha.
I remember it had an unusual horn, and my poor quality picture even shows something there.  However, I have no other clearer pictures, and I can’t see the horn.  Perhaps I misinterpreted some dirt, or damage.
Thank you again for clearly identifying him.
Fern

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this
Location: Arizona
November 28, 2015 1:12 pm
We found this caterpillar on our porch. We are wondering what kind species it is. Thanks.
Signature: Tavin

Great Ash Sphinx

Great Ash Sphinx

Dear Tavin,
Do you have a nearby ash tree?  This looks like the Hornworm of a Great Ash Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, and we are basing our ID on the curved blue horn.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image, though we believe the difference in coloration may be due to the proximity of pupation time for your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange bug
Location: Hanceville, Alabama
November 28, 2015 8:17 pm
We found this in our bed!?!?!?
Signature: diana

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Diana,
This is a Bed Bug.  The bad news is that they will suck the blood of sleeping humans and if you found one, there are likely more.  The good news is that Bed Bugs do not spread diseases.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination