From the monthly archives: "October 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Antlions in india
Location: bandipur national park
October 24, 2015 6:23 am
Hi
I snapped this at a resort in soth India today, was told it was probably a hawk moth, figured it to be an antlion, but don’t know what type…then found your site and figured I’ll give it a shot and ask…
Signature: Smitha

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Smitha,
You are correct that this is an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae, but we don’t think we will be able to provide you with much more information about the species.  We found a similar image from India on the Alamy stock photo site, but it is not identified, and we found a similar looking French Antlion, also on Alamy, that is identified as 
Palpares libelluloides.  Perhaps your individual is in the same genus.  According to TrekNature:  “This species is widespread in the Mediterranean regions and it is mainly present in Albania, Belgium. Bulgaria, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Romania and Spain.”  According to the India Biodiversity Portal, the genus is found in India.

Antlion

Antlion

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identifying bug
Location: SW Florida
October 24, 2015 8:06 am
Hello,
I am SO thankful for this site! I have found this bug on my farm that I’m hoping you can identify for me.
Thanks so much!
Signature: Adam

Shield Bug

Shield Bug

Dear Adam,
We quickly identified your Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae as
Orsilochides guttata thanks to images posted to BugGuide where the host plants are listed as ” Ipomoea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae), Croton capitatus (Euphorbiaceae)” and the type locality of Georgia indicates it is a native species.  It is also pictured on the Central Florida Critter of the Day site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Cape Coral, FL (Southwest Florida)
October 24, 2015 8:08 am
Here is a caterpillar that I found on my strawberry tree that I’m trying to figure out exactly what he is.
Thanks so much!
Signature: Adam

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Adam,
We are nearly certain that this is a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar, but they feed on passionflower.  Is there a passionflower vine growing on or near your strawberry tree?  It appears the caterpillar in your image really is feeding on a leaf, but that is not the typical food for the Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar.  Here is an image from BugGuide of a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar.

Hello,
My wife sent this incorrectly. This Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar is feeding on the leaves of a passionflower and not on a strawberry tree. You are correct. You guys are amazing.
Thank you!
Adam

Actually, I stand corrected. I have taken pictures of this bug on my passionflowers but this is on a shrub. They feed on the leaves of a certain shrub common to Southwest Florida.
Regards

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swimming pool bug
Location: Canberra Australia
October 22, 2015 9:58 pm
Hi Bugman.
I left my above ground swimming pool uncovered for approx. 6 months over winter. I didnt clean it nor did I add any chlorine. Now that its getting warmer I thought time to clean it out and start getting it healthy again. When doing so I caught 11 of these swimming bugs and I just needed to know more.
They swim to the water surface and sit there facing downwards (with the backsides toward the top).
When I stir the water they dive to the bottom (approx. 600mm) where I can’t see due to the leaves and other garbage – then do not come up for at least 5 minutes.
They appear to have 6 legs, two tails (split) and two clippers or claws on their face. They are very good at staying absolutely still, but when they swim they have a fish like turning movement. It should be noted that when I pulled them out of the water, they had no troubles walking around, moving almost like a scorpion.
I have attached a video and some pics.
This is in Canberra, Australia. Currently October (middle of spring) and heading towards summer.
Appreciate if you had any ideas on what these are?
Signature: thank you

Water Tigers

Water Tigers

These are Water Tigers, the aquatic larvae of Predaceous Diving Beetles in the family Dytiscidae.  There is a nice simple explanation of the life cycle of the Predaceous Diving Beetles on the Australian Museum website where it states:  “Larvae have a siphon (like a snorkel) coming out the end of their body. They stick this siphon out of the water to get oxygen to breathe.”  According to the Missouri Department of Conservation site:  “Larvae, called ‘water tigers,’ are elongated, flattened and can be 2 inches long. They commonly come to the surface to draw air into spiracles (like snorkels) located at the hind end of the body. There are 3 pairs of legs, and the jaws are strong pincers that are used to grasp prey.”  The Natural History of Orange County, California site has some nice images of Water Tigers.  As you can tell by our links, Predaceous Diving Beetles are found in many places on the globe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What mind of spider is this?
Location: San Francisco/ Bay Area
October 21, 2015 7:58 pm
Found this spider in our backyard in Northern California.
Signature: Mikayla

Cat-Faced Spider

Cat-Faced Spider

Dear Mikayla,
Because of the two prominent bumps on its abdomen, we believe your Orbweaver is a Cat-Faced Spider, , and you can read more about the species on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of spider?
Location: Eastern IA
October 21, 2015 7:56 pm
I know spiders aren’t “bugs,” but I see you’ve helped others identify their arachnids…wondering if you can help us with this one. My sister sent me these photos – this spider was found in eastern Iowa. We know it’s not a black widow or brown recluse, but any need to be worried about this one?
Thanks so much for your website – it’s been a great tool!
Signature: JP

Shamrock Orbweaver

Shamrock Orbweaver

Dear JP,
This is a harmless Orbweaver spider, and we believe it is a Shamrock Orbweaver,
Araneus trifolium, a member of a genus of spiders that live less than a year.  The spiders generally hatch in the spring and mature in the fall, when the attract the most attention because of their large webs and often colorful bodies.  Orbweavers respin their webs every day, and they are rarely found far from the webs, so we suspect something destroyed this lady’s web, forcing her to scuttle clumsily on the ground.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination