From the monthly archives: "October 2015"

Subject: Unique bug
Location: City park of Iron Mountain Michigan
October 23, 2015 9:19 pm
I was at the park with my son, a tiny little bug landed on me. I have never seen this type before, I tried to find out what it is but am having no luck. I am hoping this site will help me find my answer. It’s getting to the end of fall.
Signature: Amanda

Woolly Aphid

Woolly Aphid

Dear Amanda,
Your insect is a Woolly Aphid in the subfamily Eriosomatinae, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Nearly all members of this subfamily alternate between host plants, generally with a woody primary host (on which overwintering eggs are laid, and on which some species induce galls) and an herbaceous secondary host.”

Subject: Is this a katydid?
Location: Orlando, Florida
October 23, 2015 1:08 pm
Hello Bugman!
We’ve just returned from a holiday at Disney, Orlando (1st holiday abroad from the UK) and we were loving the native bugs. We snapped a photo of me holding a bug I picked up outside the hotel door and we are not sure what it is, we believe that it’s a kind of katydid or grasshopper but would appreciate your help.
Many thanks
Signature: Sallie and Glenn Kimberley, UK

Conehead

Conehead

Dear Sallie and Glenn,
This is a Conehead Katydid, possibly the Broad-Tipped Conehead,
Neoconocephalus triops, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide the range is:  “Southern United States: Long Island south to Florida. Across south to southern California.”

Subject: Weird spider grasshopper looking bug
Location: Indianapolis
October 24, 2015 10:55 am
I’ve grown up in central Indiana and I was a outdoor kid,unlike the kids these days. I had a woods and pond and creeks near by which I was at morning to night pretty much my whole childhood. I’ve turned over many logs and debris laying around and have seen all types of insects. I am 39 years old now and do all sorts of home maintaince and never encountered this type of insect. I opened a door leading to a storm shelter under this house to find the fuse box for main electricity and several of these things were just hanging around on the walls. At first glance I thought it was a huge spider but once I got closer and inspected this odd looking bug I was totally baffled to what this is and where did they come from and are they poisonous. Please help of possible.
Signature: Creeped out from indy

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear Creeped out from indy,
Camel Crickets are harmless, though they can be a nuisance as they prefer damp, dark places like basements.  They are also called Cave Crickets.

Subject: Cute orange spider
Location: Seattle, WA
October 23, 2015 10:11 pm
Found this cute little guy on my wall in the Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle. I don’t believe I’ve ever seen a spider that looks quite like this. An orbweaver of some kind?
Signature: Nick

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Hi Nick,
You are correct that this is an Orbweaver, and we believe it may be a Cat Faced Spider.

Subject: Different species of bugs aggregated?
Location: Rome, Italy
October 23, 2015 11:56 am
Hello,
my dad found this aggregation of bugs in Rome and took a picture. He then sent it to me since I am studying zoology and I started doing some researches about it. By reading your website, I found out that the situation we are looking at is immature bugs, forming aggregation. However that post was about Harlequine bugs, individually coloured of both colours black and red. While in my picture some bugs are red with black stains, while other, in the same aggregation, are entirely black.
Therefore I was wondering, are they different species? Or maybe black ones are younger and still did not develop the red colouration?
Hope you can give me some answer 🙂
Thank you very much!
Signature: Costanza

Ebony Bug Aggregation

Ebony Bug Aggregation

Dear Costanza,
We believe this is an aggregation of Ebony Bugs in the family Thyreocoridae, and that the red individuals are the immature ones.  British Bugs has images of one species.  Also pictured on British Bugs is the Burrowing Bug,
Canthophorus impressus, in the family Cydnidae.  Alas, there is not enough detail in your image to be certain.

Subject: Cerambycid I.D.
Location: Madera Canyon Road, Arizona
October 24, 2015 1:42 am
I found a number of these beautiful small cerambycids on Baccharis bushes on the side of the road going to Madera Canyon in Southern Arizona. Can you identify them for me? Thanks.
Signature: Bill King

Longhorn Beetles possibly mating

Longhorn Beetles possibly mating

Hi Bill,
Judging by the number of legs and antennae evident in your image, there appears to be another individual hidden, so you may have documented this lovely individual mating.  We found it pictured on FlickR and there it is identified as
Sphaenothecus bivittata.  According to Valerie’s Austin Bug Collection:  “The mate finding strategy of S. bivittata is rather flamboyant. Males position themselves on the highest tips of branches on flowering shrubs or small trees and keep lookout for females. Their long thin antennae wave in the wind. When females arrive, the males are quick to take action and they frequently mate while the females feed.”  According to BugGuide:  “Larval hosts: Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) and Roses (Rosa spp.)”