From the monthly archives: "October 2015"

Subject: Whats this bug?
Location: Hillsboro, MO
October 21, 2015 2:58 pm
I was feeding my
Cows and after i was done i went to sit down on the fourwheeler and then saw this bug land on it dont know what it is please help?!
Signature: I dont know this question?

Is there anyone working for this site?

Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Giant Bark Aphid

Giant Bark Aphid

We really do try to respond to as many requests as possible.  Thanks for resubmitting your image.  This is a Giant Bark Aphid,  Longistigma caryae, which you can find pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “This is the largest aphid in North America with adults averaging about 1/4 inch long. They also have long legs which makes them appear even larger. Males and some females are winged but egg laying females are wingless. They are brown with black markings (giving them somewhat of a mottled appearance) and have short, black cornicles. When alive they are often partially covered with a bluish white, waxy secretion. ” BugGuide also notes that host plants include:  “American elm, pin oak, live oak, post oak, blackjack oak, pecan, hickory, sycamore, and golden rain tree. Other trees which might be infested include maple, basswood, birch, beech, walnut, chestnut, and willow. ”

Wow thankyou so much! And sorry about the rush. Awrsome website thankyou for the help

Subject: wondering what spider this is
Location: Sacramento California
October 25, 2015 9:53 am
Found this little guy from outside and i havent ever seen one for my 20 years of life. So im just wondering what it is. Thank you!
Signature: katie

Possibly Male Cat-Faced Spider

Possibly Male Cat-Faced Spider

Dear Katie,
Were it not for the orb web, we might have thought this was a Crab Spider because of the long front legs, but Crab Spiders do not spin webs and the web is definitely an orb web, indicating this is a Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  The bumps on the abdomen remind us of the Cat-Face Spider,
Araneus gemmoides, and we suspect this is a male of the species.  As you can see by this pair pictured on BugGuide, the male is the smaller of the sexes.  According to the Cirrus Images site:  “The males are generally much smaller than the females and commonly lack the showy coloring of their fairer sex. They often spin their own smaller orb web near an outlying portion of the female’s, and I’ve noticed most males give the females wide berth. Indeed, I rarely see male orb weavers, they are so reclusive.”

Possibly Male Cat-Faced Spider

Possibly Male Cat-Faced Spider

Subject: American Oil Beetle?
Location: Hamilton Ontario
October 24, 2015 9:41 pm
Hello Bugman,
I’ve got another find for you! I think this is an American Oil Beetle, but it seems a good deal larger than the description I read. This guy was hanging out inside our museum for a day or two before I rescued him. He looked dull black indoors but once I got him out in the sunshine I could see he had a beautiful greenish sheen on him. Didn’t know what his preferred host plant was, so I hope he found something to eat! (& a warm place to hide!)
Signature: Alison

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Alison,
We don’t mean to alarm you, but you should exercise caution when handling any of the Blister Beetles in the family Meloidae as members of the family secrete a compound called cantharidin that is known to cause blistering in human skin.  Regarding Oil Beetles in the genus
Meloe, according to the University of Connecticut Home & Garden Education Center page:  “The adults feed on grass and  several leafy weeds and flowers. ”  Though The Smaller Majority site has a fascinating overview of the life cycle of the Oil Beetle, nothing is mentioned about adult food preferences.

Yikes! Thanks for letting me know. I’m glad she was in a good enough mood that no one got hurt! Will exercise caution in the future when handling unknown insects. Thank you for your time!
Alison Innes

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Makaweli Poi, Hawaii
October 24, 2015 11:07 pm
Living in Hawaii.
This bug is seen on our Gliricidia since 15 Oct 2015.
Signature: Kavi

Kiawe Borers

Kiawe Borers

Dear Kavi,
Your name is remarkably similar to the name of your Longhorned Borer Beetles, commonly called the Kiawe Borer.  It is a non-native species that feeds on introduced, cultivated mesquite plant.  Since Gliricidia and Mesquite are in the same family, perhaps the Kiawe Borer has adapted to boring in the wood of the former.

Erythrina Borer attracted to porch light
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 25, 2015
Upon walking out the front door this morning, we noticed this little Pyralid Moth that we recognized because of previous submissions.  There must be a coral tree nearby to have provided food for the caterpillars.

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

Subject: Cychrus?
Location: Studley, Virginia
October 24, 2015 2:50 pm
Hi Bugman! Seriously, I love this website!
I saw this beetle outside, and it immediately caught my eye, because it looked different than most black beetles I see.
I looked it up, and the closest I can find is that it looks like it might be in the genus Cychrus.
What do you guys think?
Love,
Signature: Allie

Small Snail Eating Beetle

Small Snail Eating Beetle

Dear Allie,
Thanks so much for your effervescent praise.  We believe you have correctly identified this Small Snail Eating Beetle to the Tribe level of Cychrini, but the genus
Cychrus, according to BugGuide, is found in the Pacific Northwest.  Based on this BugGuide image and others posted there, we believe your beetle is in the genus Sphaeroderus, and there are six species in the genus found in your area of the country, according to BugGuide.