From the monthly archives: "October 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Bugs. Temporary Name: Fuzzy Fellas
Location: Close to the beach In Solana Beach
October 26, 2015 9:28 am
Hi i found this bug over the summer while volunteering at a camp. These little bugs were all over. They look like a wasp but where the stinger was suppose to be there was fuzz. Because I was a helper to children we named them fuzzy fellas. I held them all the time and they never bit me or stung, just to be safe I didn’t let any of them hold it. These can fly but are pretty calm. I found that the most came out in the late morning, and less than that in the afternoon. I have searched everywhere to find out what theses little bugs are. Help please? Thanks!
Signature: -Kara Beth

Sycamore Borer

Sycamore Borer

Dear Kara Beth,
You are quite brave.  Though they are very effective wasp mimics, Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae are quite harmless, though they really do resemble stinging wasps.  Your individuals are Sycamore Borers,
Synanthedon resplendens, a species we originally identified from Encinitas in 2014.  According to University of California Integrated Pest Management System:  “The sycamore borer, Synanthedon resplendens, occurs in the southwestern United States. It is prevalent in sycamore and also infests oak and ceanothus. The male is mostly yellow with a brownish-black head and black bands on its body. Its legs are yellow, except for black along the margins on the portions nearest to the body. The mostly clear wings have orangish to yellow margins. Sycamores tolerate extensive boring by this insect, and generally no control is recommended.”

Sycamore Borers

Sycamore Borers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Sikkim, India
October 27, 2015 3:02 am
These spiky black caterpillars were found aggregated on nettles
Richard

Probably Indian Red Admiral Caterpillars

Possibly Indian Red Admiral Caterpillars

Dear Richard,
Thanks for supplying the name of the food plant.  Butterflies in the genus
Vanessa feed on nettles, and we suspect your caterpillars are probably Vanessa indica, the Indian Red Admiral or another member of the genus.  According to the Learn About Butterflies site:  “The larval foodplants in include Urtica, Girardinia and Boehmeria.”  According to Herb Wisdom, mettles are in the genus Urtica.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Query about bug in the house
Location: Perth Western Australia
October 26, 2015 5:48 pm
Hi there,
I was wondering if you could help us identify the bug we found in our house, in Perth, Western Australia.
I first found it in the bathroom table sink, and sometime on the wall, and they are not coming in a group like ant.
Thanks in advance for your help.
The photos of the bug are as follow :
Signature: no preference

Springtails

Springtails

You have Springtails, which are benign creatures that frequent damp locations.  They can be a nuisance if they get plentiful.

Springtail

Springtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant’s
Location: Central North Island, New Zealand
October 26, 2015 8:20 pm
I found this in my garden today, its is about 4mm in body length and dark blue with these two yellow spots
Signature: Mike

Longhorn Beetle

Longhorn Beetle

Dear Mike,
Though it resembles an Ant, this is actually a Longhorn Beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  Several years ago we posted an image of a mating pair that were identified as being in the genus
Zorion.  there are many nice images on the GrahamNZ website and there is also a nice image on FlickR

Thank you for the information.  I phoned someone who should have known and was told by him it was a flower bug
At least I know its basically harmless.  It will now go in the files with the spiney spiders found last year
Mike

Hi again Mike,
In defense of your source, we do have a comment on our previous posting indicating this is a Flower Longhorn, however our research, including a scholarly article on the Massey University of New Zealand site, has determined that it is in the subfamily Cerambycinae, not Lepturinae whose members are commonly called Flower Longhorns according to BugGuide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Navegantes – SC, Brazil
October 26, 2015 10:02 am
Found at Navegantes, south of brazil, is timid, when i try to approach it, it walks away a little. Is territorialist, i never found any spider next to it, same species, nor other species.
Signature: Julian Silva

Orbweaver with Spiderlings

Orbweaver with Spiderlings

Dear Julian,
This is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and they are a harmless and beneficial family whose members rarely stray far from their orb shaped webs.  If you look closely on the left side of this little lady, you will see what looks like newly hatched spiderlings.  They will soon disperse by ballooning.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs our sister site out of Brazil, Insetologia, will be able to provide a species identification.

Correction:  October 27, 2015
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we now know that this is
Nephilengys cruentata in the Orbweaver family Nephilidae, not Araneidae.  See FlickR and Insectologia for images

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hypsosinga pygmaea??
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
October 26, 2015 11:17 am
Hi! I have found two of these spiders in my house in the past month. From what I’ve searched on the internet it looks like it’s a hypsosinga pygmaea. Can you please validate that for me?? And I can’t seem to find if they are venomous or not. Thank you in advance.
Signature: im not sure what this is asking?

Orbweaver:  Hypsosinga pygmaea

Orbweaver: Hypsosinga pygmaea

Congratulations on what we believe is a correct identification of a new species for our site, and we know how difficult some identifications can be.  We are basing our agreement with your identification on images posted to BugGuide, and though BugGuide has no specific information on the species we can generalize based on family information.  Most all spiders are venomous, but very few have either powerful enough venom to do damage to a human or strong enough mandibles to be able to bite a human.  Most spider bites will result in little more than local swelling and tenderness, so they are not a threat to humans.  Members of the family Araneidae, according to BugGuide, called:  “Orb weavers are very docile, non-aggressive spiders that will flee at the first sign of a threat (typically they will run or drop off the web). They are not dangerous to people & pets, and are actually quite beneficial because they will catch and eat a lot of pest-type insects. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination