From the monthly archives: "October 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spotted and striped Spider
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
October 2, 2015 5:40 am
Hello!
My sister moved the dog’s dish on my Parent’s Acreage right out side Edmonton, Alberta and came across this Red abdomen Spider(? It does appear to have eight legs) with striped legs. We’ve lived at this house for 20 years and never seen anything like this
Searching Google we think it’s either a American house Spider or a spotted Orbweaver? However none seem to match the bright red colour.
Please help us what’s that Bug!
Signature: Sonya, Heebee Jeebied out but curious

Shamrock Orbweaver

Shamrock Orbweaver

Dear Sonya,
We believe this is most likely a Shamrock Orbweaver,
Araneus trifolium, a highly variable species that is sometimes found in this color pattern as this image on BugGuide indicates.  Like other Orbweavers, the Shamrock Orbweaver is considered harmless.

I’d have to agree! Thank you for your Quick response!!!
I’ve been a huge Fan of Whatsthatbug for about 10 years now! Keep up the good work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue tarantula
Location: San Antonio, Texas
September 30, 2015 10:08 pm
I discovered this blue tarantula in my backyard this morning. I was having difficulties finding any information on it online. I’m located outside of San Antonio, Texas. The spider was around 3 inches long.
Signature: Ryan Walters

Blue Tarantula???

Blue Tarantula???

Dear Ryan,
The only Tarantulas listed on BugGuide from Texas are in the genus
Aphonopelma, and we did locate one image on BugGuide of Aphonopelma behlei  that has a bluish cast, but not as extreme as your individual.  Perhaps someone with more knowledge on Tarantulas will be able to provide additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Alabama
September 30, 2015 2:07 pm
Please tell me what kind of bug this is.
Signature: Thank you. Tammy p

Southern Flannel Moth

Southern Flannel Moth

Dear Tammy p,
This is a Southern Flannel Moth,
Megalopyge opercularis, and your individual is a male as evidenced by the feathery antennae and pronounced markings.  Though you might not be familiar with the adult moth, many folks in the South are quite familiar with its larval form, commonly called a Puss Caterpillar or Asp.  According to BugGuide:  “Caution, caterpillars have painful sting.  Occasionally, in outbreak years, puss caterpillars are sufficiently numerous to defoliate some trees (Bishopp 1923). However, their main importance is medical. In Texas, they have been so numerous in some years that schools in San Antonio in 1923 and Galveston in 1951 were closed temporarily because of stings to children (Diaz 2005).”  Images of the Asp are much more common on our site that those of the adult Southern Flannel Moth.  Since it is the first of October, we have selected your submission to be our featured Bug of the Month for October 2015.

Asps from our archive

Asps (image from our archive)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination