From the monthly archives: "October 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

October 28, 2015
The staff of What’s That Bug? will be out of the office for several days and we will not be answering any mail, so if possible, save your identification requests for next week.  We will be in Austin on official business, but we hope to have a good time.  Perhaps we will even get invited to a Cave Party.

Cave Spider: Real or Halloween Decoration???

Cave Spider: Real or Halloween Decoration???

Update:  November 2, 2015
We’re back, and we had a wonderful time in Austin.  Halloween costumes on 6th Street and Rainey Avenues were spectacular, and though we were not invited to a cave party, we did try to observe the bats on the Congress Avenue “Bat Bridge”, but alas we were not treated to a mass emergence.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: DESERT SPIDER
Location: Barstow California
October 28, 2015 12:58 pm
I was walking my dog through the mojave desert when I nearly ran into this guy strung up in his web between a cresote and Russian thistle. He is the size of a 50¢ piece all stretched out. I thought it was an odd colored male black widow. I have never seen this type of spider before. Can you tell me what it is?
Signature: B slack

Banded Argiope

Banded Argiope

Dear B slack,
We believe yours is the first submission we have ever received from Barstow.  This is a very pale colored Banded Argiope,
Argiope trifasciata, an impressive but harmless species of Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not sure what I’m seeing
Location: Atlanta, GA
October 28, 2015 8:55 am
Hi,
About four days ago I started seeing lots of very tiny bugs crawling on the cushions of my outdoor furniture. I have been trying to brush them away, but they keep reappearing. I have also seen a bug that looks to be a larger/grown version of the tiny bug.
Is the small bug and large big the same thing? Please help me identify this bug. Thank you!
Signature: Eric b

Snowy Tree Cricket

Snowy Tree Cricket

Dear Eric,
Your images of the smaller insect are quite blurry and there is not enough detail to be certain, but they might be Aphids.  They are not the same as the larger insect which is a Snowy Tree Cricket or Thermometer Cricket, a species that can be used to tell the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit by counting the chirps it emits and plugging the number into a simple formula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Packing the Garage
Location: Arizona
October 27, 2015 10:27 pm
I was packing the garage and saw this on the ground I was kinda scared of it and assumed it was a bad bug like a cockroach sac or something and squished it and was very confused to have green liquid come out. I don’t think there was anything in it so I am worried about what it was.
Signature: Scared of these things

Moth Pupa

Moth Pupa

This is a squashed Moth pupa.

Thank you for responding. So that is common for them to have green liquid on the inside?

When a caterpillar undergoes metamorphosis and enters the pupal stage, the interior organs break down into what scientists refer to as “soup” and here is the explanation from Scientific American:  “But what does that radical transformation entail? How does a caterpillar rearrange itself into a butterfly? What happens inside a chrysalis or cocoon?  First, the caterpillar digests itself, releasing enzymes to dissolve all of its tissues. If you were to cut open a cocoon or chrysalis at just the right time, caterpillar soup would ooze out. But the contents of the pupa are not entirely an amorphous mess. Certain highly organized groups of cells known as imaginal discs survive the digestive process. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Guatemala City
October 27, 2015 9:12 pm
Hello,
I found this beauty going up my bathroom wall tonight. A bit of research turned out the name polydrusus formosus.
Please confirm.
Thank you.
Signature: Jose

Leaf Beetle, we believe

Eumolpini Leaf Beetle

Dear Jose,
Despite the similarity in coloration, we do not believe this is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus, nor any other species of Weevil.  In our opinion, the antennae look too different and we believe this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  Compare the antennae on your individual to this image on BugGuide.  Look at the image of Colapsis sanjoseana on the Nash Turley website, but you have to scroll down, and upon cross checking that name, we found this FlickR image of an individual from Costa Rica.  The Early Birder website calls it the Eumolpini Leaf Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tick or Mite
Location: Jacksonville,AR USA
October 27, 2015 8:56 pm
I keep finding these in my house everywhere in the bathroom living room and even our clothes. We have one cat and that’s it he occasionally goes outside but not for very long. Please help.
Signature: Joseph Ederington

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Joseph,
You have Bed Bugs.  You should probably seek professional assistance in their eradication.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination