From the monthly archives: "September 2015"

Subject: Centipede brushing his hair
Location: South Carolina
September 25, 2015 7:18 pm
My wife was getting ready to go to bed. After changing clothes she reached for the hair brush. When she felt something tickle her hand, she looked down and screamed. She threw the brush and this not so small centipede against the mirror. When I came to see what was wrong, I found him hiding behind my can of shaving cream. Can you tell me what type he is? Also just so you know, I work on the catch and release program. Especially for the little critters that help me keep the other creepy crawlers out.
Signature: Ron

Bark Centipede

Bark Centipede

Dear Ron,
This is a Bark Centipede in the order Scolopendromorpha, and because of the fat terminal legs, we believe it is either in the family Scolopendridae or Plutoniumidae, based on images posted to BugGuide.  We do not feel confident with any more specific identification, however, due to your “catch and release program” we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Subject: Some sort of Bee?
Location: Wexford, PA
September 26, 2015 12:22 pm
I spotted this Bee- Hornet-Wasp? In my wife’s flowers the other day and I was wondering if you could tell me what it is?
Signature: Still amazed

Diurnal Sphinx Moth

Diurnal Sphinx Moth

Dear Still amazed,
This is a diurnal Sphinx Moth in the genus
Hemaris, but there is not enough detail in the image to accurately provide a species identification.

Subject: Dear Bug Expert
Location: South East Texas
September 24, 2015 8:35 am
Bugman I don’t know what kind of centipede this is. Or if it even is one! Sorry about the shaving cream my little sister found this in her room and sent me a picture. I was laughing because she said she didn’t want to harm it. (She’s 16)
Signature: -Scared Sister

Centipede contained with shaving cream

Centipede contained with shaving cream

Dear Scared Sister,
While we are unable to provide you with any more specific information about this Centipede, we are very amused with your sister’s creative use of shaving cream to contain the critter.  We can’t help but to wonder what ever happened to the many legged predator.

Surprisingly the critter drowned it self trying to get out. I had no idea this would work. After that my dad just burned it. I really wanted to know what kind of centipede it was because I’ve only seen about three kinds never that kind. But it’s okay, how harmful are centipedes?

Some Centipedes can deliver a painful bite.

Subject: Cricket with wings or a Beetle
Location: Arizona
September 24, 2015 10:11 pm
A friend of mine was traveling in Arizona and she almost stepped on this big 2 inch bug/beetle,
It looks kind of like a big black fly but also looks lie a cricket with wings.
Can you tell me what it is?
Signature: Darlene

Giant Mesquite Bug

Giant Mesquite Bug

Dear Darlene,
Your friend encountered a Giant Mesquite Bug.  Most of the images of this species on our site are of the colorful immature Giant Mesquite Bugs that feed in groups.  The flattened segment on the antennae is quite distinctive, and the powerful legs on your individual indicates it is a male.

Subject: Help…
Location: NC
September 25, 2015 12:58 am
Me and a few coworkers saw this bug at work yesterday and I thought it was a baby mantis but coworkers think differently. It jumps and also has wings that you can see in photo. Thanks for your help.
Signature: A Puzzled Working Woman

Snowy Tree Cricket

Snowy Tree Cricket

Dear Puzzled Working Woman,
We believe your Tree Cricket is a Snowy Tree Cricket, a species sometimes called a Thermometer Cricket because it can be used in lieu of a thermometer to determine the temperature.  Like many other Orthopterans, the Snowy Tree Cricket uses sound to attract a mate, and according to Charles Hogue in his wonderful book
Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, one can determine the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit:  “if one counts the number of chirps in 13 seconds and adds 40.”

Subject: T Bug ?
Location: Lancaster U K
September 25, 2015 3:56 am
My daughter recently informed me of a bug that she had found on the garden fence , it had four legs and a possible two more that trailed behind its body . its main body shape formation was in the shape of a letter T . However , i am not sure if part of its body was wings.
I would be very grateful if you could inform me what it is
Many Thanks
Signature: Andrew Hogarth

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Dear Andrew,
This is a Plume Moth in the family  Pterophoridae.  Like other insects, the Plume Moth actually has three pairs of legs, and the crossbar of the “T” is actually two pairs of wings.