From the monthly archives: "September 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My Nephew would like to know what this is.
Location: Southern California (Whittier)
September 26, 2015 10:50 pm
Hi! So, I had just picked up my nephew from Kindergarten, when we spotted this little guy scurrying around on the sidewalk. My nephew thought it was the coolest thing, but when he asked me what it was, I couldn’t give him an answer. I would love to know what this is, because once he finds out, he’ll want to look up videos of it on YouTube lol. Thanks a bunch for your time!
Signature: Auntie Alex

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Dear Auntie Alex,
The Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, is also known as the Goldenrain Tree Bug because that common landscaping tree produces seeds eaten by the Red Shouldered Bug.  This species often forms large aggregations when feeding.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Longhorn Beetle
Location: Gard, France
September 24, 2015 11:18 am
Hello,
I found this longhorn beetle wandering across our terrace earlier. Do you have any idea of what sort it is?
Signature: Kinyonga

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear Kinyonga,
We haven’t the time to research this right now, but we are posting your image of a Longicorn and perhaps one of our readers can supply some information.

Unidentified Longicorn

Unidentified Longicorn

Cesar Crash provides an identification
Hi, there!
I think this longhorn is Monochamus galloprovincialis.
Best Cesar Crash

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
September 24, 2015 3:38 pm
Found this big ol guy crossing the street headed to our pond. Can’t seem to figure out what he is!
Signature: The Castro Family

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Banded Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Castro Family,
This magnificent caterpillar is a Banded Sphinx Caterpillar,
Eumorpha fasciatus, and you can compare your individual to this image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Evening Primrose, Oenothera species, Water Primrose, Ludwigia species, and other related plants (Onagraceae).”  Most Sphinx Moth caterpillars pupate underground, and we suspect this large individual stopped feeding and was looking for a good location to dig underground to commence metamorphosis.  This is such a great image illustrating a child’s wonder with the natural world that we have decided to feature your submission.

Thanks for the help!! We spent a Looooooooong time researching and couldn’t find  out what it was!! Interesting that it feeds on water plants! No wonder it was by our pond!!
That’s so cool you’re going to feature our photo! Where can we see it? On your website?
Thanks again for the help! We can complete our nature journal entry! 🙂
Heidi E Castro

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Carmel, Indiana
September 25, 2015 2:37 pm
I was outside walking with my kids today and found a bug I have never seen before. It followed us when I walked around it to try and get a better look. I don’t like bugs and it looked like it had wings so I didn’t get too close. From the picture it looks like it has 6 legs on one side. I live in Carmel, IN and am used to bugs, but not like this! Any idea what it is? Thanks for any information you may have!
Signature: Stephanie

Mating Wheel Bugs

Mating Wheel Bugs

Dear Stephanie,
If you look closely at your image, you will see that this is actually a mating pair of Wheel Bugs and not an individual, hence your observation that there are six legs on one side.  Wheel Bugs are capable of biting, but they move lethargically and they are not aggressive toward humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This flew into our garage
Location: Southeast texas
September 25, 2015 6:55 pm
What kind of bug is this
Signature: Erika

Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth

Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth

Dear Erika,
Though it mimics a stinging wasp, the Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth is perfectly harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery beetle or queen of the ants?
Location: Connecticut
September 26, 2015 4:32 pm
This bug was found crawling on the ground in our backyard in Connecticut. The front half looks very ant like but the abdomen was huge in proportion. It had little pronto wings but looked like it could not fly. We left it in a protected place to continue its journey after taking its photo.
Signature: Bug lover

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Bug lover,
This is an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe, one of the Blister Beetles.  Blister Beetles can secrete a compound known as cantharidin that can cause blistering in human skin, so Blister Beetles should be handled with caution, or not at all.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination