From the monthly archives: "September 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: South Carolina
September 28, 2015 11:36 am
I need to know what kind of beetle I found in the woods of South Carolina during September please. Will you figure it out?
Signature: Lucas Prickett

Passalid Beetle

Passalid Beetle

Dear Lucas,
This is a Bess Beetle or Passalid Beetle, a species that lives in rotted wood.  According to BugGuide, they have an “Unusual (for beetles) subsocial lifestyle. Adults and larvae live together in family groups in galleries excavated in rotting wood by adults. Adults care for larvae, and actively feed them prechewed food. Both adults and larvae stridulate, which is used for communication within the group. See Generic Guide to New World Scarab Beetles for more details.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown caterpillar consuming Indigobush & Serviceberry
Location: Reston VA
September 28, 2015 5:52 pm
Please identify a caterpillar for me and if it’s a butterfly or moth; 3 pictures attached. Many of the same caterpillar are consuming an Indigobush and have moved on to a nearby Serviceberry.
Signature: Margaret Grieshaber

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Margaret,
Your Red Humped Caterpillar,
Schizura concinna, will become a moth in the family Notodontidae.   According to BugGuide, Red Humped Caterpillars:  ” feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”

Dear Daniel – Thank you very much for a quick reply!  Believe we’ll just let it happen and not do anything to disturb them. Thanks again, Margaret

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Eastern Crane Fly
Location: Washington, Pennsylvania
September 28, 2015 1:03 am
I found an interesting bug in my dogs water bowl and i had no idea what it was until i found it on your site. I wanted to share the photo of the Giant Eastern Crane Fly! This is the first time I’ve ever come across one of these beauties, and let me just say, I’m very glad to know it’s harmless!
Signature: Jessicarenae

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Dear Jessicarenae,
You are correct that this is a Giant Eastern Crane Fly,
Pedicia albivitta, and the stark white background in your image nicely illustrates the lovely markings on the wings of this species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: holy cow, there’s a lot of ’em
Location: Chicago, IL
September 27, 2015 2:15 pm
I was weeding this afternoon, in a spot that I should have weeded months ago. The weeds were a low ground-cover, pervasive. As I moved along, each time I cleared an area, there’d be a bunch of these guys under the weeds, anywhere from as small as 1/8 inch up to about 1/2 inch. This was along the south wall of the house along the field-stone-and-mortar foundation that rises about 4 feet above the soil bed (we’re told the house was built around 1900 in the city of Chicago).
You were kind enough to post my last submission: 2006/03/03/newly-emerged-polyphemus-moth/
I waited 9.5 years to ask again, I didn’t want to seem greedy 😉
Signature: Todd

Long-Necked Seed Bugs

Long-Necked Seed Bugs

Dear Todd,
We hope you don’t wait another 9.5 years to write back to us.  Your image clearly depicts both winged adult and immature Long-Necked Seed Bugs,
Myodocha serripes, a species that according to BugGuide:  “Two generations per year; overwinters as adult in leaf litter or under bark of trees in woodlands.”  BugGuide also indicates it feeds on “Seeds of strawberry and St. John’s wort. Sometimes a pest of strawberries.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified bugs
Location: Catskill, NY
September 28, 2015 3:26 am
On Sept 27, 2015, I photographed these two enjoying the after sun on my car door in Catskill, NY. They seemed to be enjoying themselves and so was I! Love to know what they are.
Thanks!
Signature: Ken Tannenbaum

Mating March Flies

Mating March Flies

Dear Ken,
These are mating March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and they exhibit sexual dimorphism in that the head of the male is larger to accommodate the larger eyes.  We believe we have correctly identified your March Flies as
Penthetria heteroptera thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it indicates they are active in the fall, distinguishing them from most March Flies that appear in the spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sabino canyon , Tucson AZ glow worm
Location: tucson. AZ, USA
September 27, 2015 10:06 pm
i ran across this bug during a night walk in Sabino Canyon, Tucson, AZ. It has a green glow in the tail.
It was in a riparian area but I found it on land crawling between two bodies of water.
I thought it might be s hellgrammite , but have not found a picture that is similar
Signature: thanks, Lance

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Dear Lance,
This is not a Glowworm.  It is a Firefly Larva and they are in distictly different families.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Microphotus which is limited to western states.  Your individual looks very similar to this BugGuide image of Microphotus angustus, but that species is only reported in California.  Four other members of the genus are reported in Arizona, according to BugGuide, but no images of the larva are available.  Then again, it might be a member of a different genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination