From the monthly archives: "August 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug sucking on a monarch caterpillar
Location: SE Wisconsin
August 3, 2015 5:34 pm
Dear Bugman,
We have swamp milkweed in front of my parents’ house and the monarchs love it. For the first time ever, I found this bug sucking the insides out of one of the caterpillars. This was Aug. 3 at about 5 in the evening. I’m familiar with assassin bugs, but not ones like this. I didn’t kill it, but moved it to another part of the yard so it wouldn’t eat the other caterpillars too!
Signature: A.M.

Immature Spined Soldier Bug eats Monarch Caterpillar

Immature Spined Soldier Bug eats Monarch Caterpillar

Dear A.M.,
The predator is a Predatory Stink Bug, the Spined Soldier Bug in the genus
Podisus, and it is an immature nymph.  This is not the first time we have received an image of an immature Spined Soldier Bug eating a Monarch Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dominican Republic beetle
Location: Cabrera, Dominican Republic
August 3, 2015 5:02 pm
What is this insect?
Found on North east Coast of Dominican Republic today, August 3, summer.
Signature: Fotini

Ox Beetle

Ox Beetle

Dear Fotini,
This is an Ox Beetle in the genus
Strategus, and the horns indicate it is a male.

Thanks Daniel
Fotini (aged 5).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Recluse or Harmless?
Location: Antelope Valley, California
July 30, 2015 2:50 pm
I found this big guy in my yard, polled my friends, half say it’s a brown recluse, half say it’s harmless… One guy said “it’s just a penny”…
I live in the high desert in Southern California, it’s super dry and hot. Help me out here!
Signature: -Roni

Male Crevice Weaver Spider, we believe

Male Crevice Weaver Spider, we believe

Hi Roni,
We are going to side with the half that say it is harmless.  Brown Recluse Spiders have a violin pattern on the cephalothorax .  Male Crevice Weaver Spiders in the genus
Kukulcania, including the male Southern House Spider, Kukulcania hibernalis, are frequently mistaken for Brown Recluse Spiders.  BugGuide only lists the Southern House Spider as far west as Texas, but a relative, Kukulcania geophila, is found in California and this image from BugGuide looks very similar to your individual.  Of the entire genus Kukulcania, BugGuide notes:  “Males look very similar to the Recluse spiders, except they have much longer pedipalps, eight eyes (not six as in the Recluse family), and very long front legs.”  Finally, according to BugGuide, the Brown Recluse Spider does not get as far west as California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mantis
Location: Fulto, MO
July 31, 2015 7:55 pm
Found this little sweet thing on my roses. Would like to know more about it. Haven’t been able to find anything.
Thanks for the site! I love bugs!!!
Signature: Angela

Immature Mantis

Immature Mantis

Dear Angela,
This Mantis is an immature individual, and we are not certain of its species.  We have not had any success finding an image of a similarly marked Mantis as the green legs with the brown “knees” is quite distinctive.  Perhaps one of our readers who knows more about Mantids can provide some additional information.

thank you. i will try to keep an eye on him and the others like him that seem to love my roses. as i can, i will send more pics as they progress.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider by swimming pool
Location: Rollingwood, Texas
August 3, 2015 6:01 am
This approx. 3 inch spider has been lying in wait for prey (we think) right inside the opening to one of our pool’s skimmer baskets. There is some rather loose webbing spun inside where we can reach in to remove the basket proper.
I can’t find a spider with similar markings – everything I find has lighter color bands between darker bands rather than dark bands in the center. The legs are slightly banded as well.
I’d like to get proper ID so I can assure folks using the pool the spider isn’t after them and is harmless to swim around? Thank you very much.
Signature: AnxiousPoolMom

Fishing Spider

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Dear AnxiousPoolMom,
This is definitely a Nursery Web Spider in the family Pisauridae, and we are relatively certain it is a Six Spotted Fishing Spider,
Dolomedes triton, which is a variable species that can be viewed on BugGuide.  Fishing Spiders in the genus Dolomedes are frequently found in the immediate vicinity of a body of water, hence the attractiveness of your pool.  Though they get quite large, Fishing Spiders are not aggressive towards humans and they are not considered dangerous.  There is always the possibility that a bite might occur if carelessly handling a larger spider, but we feel the chances of being bitten are quite slim.

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Daniel:  Thank you!  We have two adult children (one of whom brings his dog over to swim) and though neither is particularly skittish around spiders, due to the size of this one I wanted to be able to assure them there’s no reason to try and harm the spider or even chase it off.  We don’t spray (with rare exceptions) and try to take a no-kill approach whenever possible.  I always feel proper ID is one of the best adjuncts to that approach, but simply couldn’t make the identification in this case.
I sincerely appreciate your help. /Deb Wilson

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oahu Caterpillar
Location: Pearl Harbor, Oahu, HI
July 31, 2015 10:38 am
I can’t figure out what this caterpillar is, I’ve seen several on google that are close, but not exactly the same, the closest match I’ve seen was a caterpillar that’s indigenous to Europe.
I live on Oahu and this guy was hanging out on my fence- I only noticed him because my dog kept trying to eat him.
Any help would be great!
Signature: Deanna H.

Unknown Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear Deanna,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  According to the Sphingidae of Hawaii page, there are 13 known species in Hawaii, and your caterpillar does not match any of the images on the site, though several species do not include caterpillar images.  It is possible that this is a newly introduced species since many plants and animals on Hawaii are not native.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information.

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
Agrius cingulata with reduced brown along the diagonal stripes.
Please see if I can get permission to post.
Bill

Update from Bill Oehlke:  August 28, 2016
Daniel,
I would not like to say that George is wrong. It could be Blackburn’s
Sphinx, but I still favour A. cingulata. For me I would have to see the adult
to make a final, totally confident judgement.
Unfortunately I do not think that is possible. Maybe over the next several
years someone else will capture a similar specimen, put it in a jar to
pupate and then will photograph the adult moth.
I look for blackburns to have a much darker anal horn, but perhaps that is a
variable feature.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination