From the monthly archives: "August 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of moth?
Location: Haines City. Florida
August 4, 2015 9:06 am
Is this a type of Moth?
Signature: Alex Dove

Banded Sphinx

Banded Sphinx

Dear Alex,
Your moth is a Banded Sphinx,
Eumorpha fasciatus, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Evening Primrose, Oenothera species, Water Primrose, Ludwigia species, and other related plants (Onagraceae).  Adults are crepuscular to nocturnal and feed on nectar.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow beetle 7 small spots
Location: Pennsylvania
August 3, 2015 6:59 pm
This beetle was on the porch screen today. Roughly about the length of a quarter but skinnier. Gloss almost like it was painted with clear nail polish. We do have a vegetable garden outside. Black legs. Small black spots as shown on the picture. Aug 2015. Pennsylvania.
What type of bug? Good or bad? He is rather pretty.
Signature: Chris

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Hi Chris,
This distinctive beetle is a Grapevine Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: From my bucket garden
Location: Chicago, Illinois
July 27, 2015 8:12 am
Saw this in my bucket garden and I’m just a touch worried is going to eat my herbs and veggies. Any idea what it is? And if it’s dangerous to an urban herb and veggie garden?
Thank you so much!
Signature: Liz

Possibly Round Headed Katydid Nymph

Possibly Round Headed Katydid Nymph

Dear Liz,
This is an immature male Katydid, probably a Round Headed Katydid in the genus
Amblycorypha based on images posted to BugGuide.  Though Katydids do munch on leaves, we allow them to feed in our own garden because we like the sounds they provide.  They are solitary feeders, and in our opinion, they do not eat enough to cause any damage to the plants.

Possibly Round Headed Katydid Nymph

Possibly Round Headed Katydid Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very small yellow bug
Location: Central Ontario canada
July 26, 2015 4:09 pm
What is this?
Signature: Todd

Aphid

Aphid

Dear Todd,
This is some species of Aphid.  We found a posting on the Backyard Arthropod Project that looks like your Aphid, and links to BugGuide’s pages on the subgenus 
Lineomyzocallis and to the genus Myzocallis, both of which are reported in Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Admiral Butterfly
Location: Lancashire, UK
August 4, 2015 5:20 am
Hey Bugman,
found this beautiful butterfly (which I believe is a Red Admiral) yesterday while I was out running. It seemed very docile and only flew off when I moved in closer, was in the same spot when I was on the way back. ^^ Just thought I’d submit it. 🙂
Signature: Hope you like. Jordan.

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Dear Jordan,
Though we are quite aware that the Red Admiral is found throughout the northern hemisphere, most of the images on our site are from North America, so your UK submission is a great addition to our site.  According to UK Butterflies:  “The Red Admiral is a frequent visitor to gardens throughout the British Isles and one of our most well-known butterflies. This butterfly is unmistakable, with the velvety black wings intersected by striking red bands.  This butterfly is primarily a migrant to our shores, although sightings of individuals and immature stages in the first few months of the year, especially in the south of England, mean that this butterfly is now considered resident. This resident population is considered to only be a small fraction of the population seen in the British Isles, which gets topped up every year with migrants arriving in May and June that originate in central Europe. Unfortunately, most individuals are unable to survive our winter, especially in the cooler regions of the British Isles.  The number of adults seen in any one year is therefore dependent on the number of migrants reaching the British Isles and numbers fluctuate as a result. In some years this butterfly can be widespread and common, in others rather local and scarce.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big found in Southern Indiana
Location: Southern Indiana
August 3, 2015 5:26 pm
This bug was found in a friends garage. There were several around. And if you bothered them, they would roll up into a ball and then later unroll and crawl off. It was a fluffy looking little fella about one inch long.
Signature: June bullock

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

Hi June,
Is there milkweed growing near the garage?  This is a Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle, and they are never found far from a milkweed food plant.

Thank you for such a quick response.  My friend will be happy to know this little fellow has a name. She was showing it to everybody trying to find out what it was.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination