From the monthly archives: "August 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help tree is covered
Location: Woodlawn TN
August 29, 2015 10:44 am
We have a tree covered with white flying bugs! I went to cut limbs today and it was like snow coming down! Hundreds of it these flying about! If you didn’t know my truck was white you would like it was with these bugs! Thanks for you time!
Signature: Woodymac

Lace Bugs

Lace Bugs

Dear Woodymac,
You have Lace Bugs in the family Tingidae, and according to BugGuide, they:  “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”

Lace Bugs

Lace Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown Moth
Location: Walkerton, Indiana
August 28, 2015 3:53 pm
I was out cleaning up brush around the house and I saw this moth sitting on my porch steps. Not sure what kind it is, but it is a nice looking one.
Signature: Edward

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Edward,
This Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala is a masterful example of camouflage.  The underwings are often brightly colored red, pink or orange with black stripes, but they are hidden when the moth rests, often on a tree trunk where it blends in perfectly with the bark.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long legged spider
Location: Plainview, Long Island, NY
August 28, 2015 4:20 pm
I originally thought this spider was a daddy long legs variety but then thought otherwise based on the stance and body shape. I found it on my son’s swingset at 7PM on August 28. We are in Plainview, Long Island, NY. I assume it is nocturnal since it was not yet active even with my hand only a couple of inches over it. I saw no sign of a web. It appears to be missing one leg, presumably from a lost fight.
Signature: psinkiws

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear psinkiws,
Daddy-Long-Legs and Harvestman are both common names for Arachnids in the order Opiliones, like your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Six-legged spider?
Location: Norfolk County, Ontario
August 29, 2015 9:18 am
Is this a spider that has lost two of its legs? Or some kind of insect? Seen on a morning glory vine in summer in Norfolk County, Ontario.
Signature: Tim

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear Tim,
Your Arachnid is a Harvestman or Daddy-Long-Legs in the order Opiliones, and it is missing several legs.  Like Spiders, Opiliones have four pairs of legs, but they do not have poison glands, so they are harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what insec
Location: standerton, south africa
August 29, 2015 9:17 am
I have never seen this insect before, living in the same town for 30 years….
Signature: solene

PIcture Winged Fly

PIcture Winged Fly

Hi Solene,
This reminded us of a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, so we searched iSpot for South African species, and though we did not find an exact match, we did find several images that looked very similar, including this iSpot posting, though it is only identified to the family level.  The common name for the family in South Africa is Picture Winged Fly, but that same name is used on iSpot for the family Ulidiidae as well.  We are confident that in South Africa, Picture Winged Fly is an appropriate name for your individual, though we cannot say for certain to which family it belongs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?
Location: Putnam, CT 06260
August 26, 2015 1:20 pm
We found 2 of these caterpillars today (August 26,2015) in Putnam, CT while we were trimming bushes. The crew is very curious what they are as none of us had ever seen anything like it before. Each one was about 5 inches long and they were eating a vine-like weed growing inside a forsythia bush. We found them between 11:00 AM and 1:00PM.
Everyone also wanted to know if they were poisonous. It looks like there are barbs or stingers on the body, guessing for protection?
Thank you do your help! Hope to hear back from you.
Signature:  Steve Gallant and The Crew at Eclipse Landscaping

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Dear Steve and Crew,
Your impressive caterpillars are Cecropia Moth Caterpillars, and the fleshy protuberances are not barbs or stingers.  Cecropia Moth Caterpillars pose no threat to humans.  Your large individuals have probably attained maximum growth and they will soon spin a cocoon and molt into a pupa that will overwinter, with the adult Cecropia Moth emerging next spring.  We are very curious what vine they were feeding upon, because according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow. may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

Cecropia Moth Caterpillar

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination