What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug project
Location: Wisconsin
August 25, 2015 1:29 pm
Hi there! My name is Jada and I am a highschool student in Wisconsin, for a summer project we had to collect and identify 25 insects and I am having trouble finding the name and classification for these three bugs, it would be great if you could help me out! If not that’s totally fine!
Signature: Thanks! Jada

Placid Stag Beetle image captured January 8, 2015

Placid Stag Beetle image captured January 8, 2015

Dear Jada,
We do have a policy that you should know about, but your communication is very polite and by our accounts, you should have already identified 22 insects for your project as you are only requesting assistance with three.  We will provide you with an identity for one and we will give you categories for the other two.
Were we your teacher, the first thing we would ask is “How could an image dated January 8, 2015 have been visually collected this summer?”  This is a female Stag Beetle in the genus
Lucanus, and after browsing BugGuide, we determined it to be a female Lucanus placidus based on the BugGuide description:  “Similar to L. capreolus, but much darker, elytra more punctate. Legs dark reddish brown, no light brown patches as in capreolus.”  Male Stag Beetles have much larger mandibles.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We are going to unofficially call this a Placid Stag Beetle based on the BugGuide definition:  “placidus – Latin for ‘smooth, pleasing.'”  Your other images are of a beetle and a true bug.  You can peruse our own archives or check BugGuide for the remaining two images.

stag_female_jada_cu

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Wisconsin

5 Responses to Female Placid Stag Beetle

  1. Curious Girl says:

    Where was the date you found Bugman? I know every once in a while my camera when I turn it on — for no apparent reason — wants to do the whole date & time thing over again. If I don’t have time to waste playing its game (perhaps there is a bug I want to capture) then I will just hit okay and end up with a January 1st date which will keep time until the next date demand instance, or I realize and change the date (rarely does that happen), so no telling what the date will be on my photos. But I am sure there are quite a few that have January 8 on them no matter what time of year it was actually taken. The other possibility is that “Jan” was chosen rather than “Jun”

    • bugman says:

      The date is visible on the first image of the posting in the lower right hand corner.

      • Curious Girl says:

        Ah, I see. In most of the rest of the world, outside of the US, the date is reversed for the month and year so it could be August 1st.

        Are stag beetles active in January?

        • bugman says:

          Very good point. We never considered that. Duhhhh.

          • Curious Girl says:

            Yeah yeah, it’s a common problem for many people for various reasons (plane tickets, hotel reservations and so on) and it still hangs me up even after 4 years outside the US, but so far I have not encountered another country that keeps dates like the US (well, except Canada which uses 3 types of dating). So even though the picture was taken in the US, chances are the camera is not from the US, and since even the other English language countries use the international dating standard it’s a plausible explanation.

            Anyway, it is good to get out of the country to stretch the wings so to say, because as several varieties of wasps might utter, “there is more than one way to skin a caterpillar.” :^)

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