What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ?
Location: On a vanilla plant
August 4, 2015 12:25 pm
Found an interesting looking Catapillar on my patio- my enclosed patio – during recent heavy downpours in Central Florida – Zone 9B
He may have come in accidentally on some other plant I was moving around I am very familiar with butterfly caterpillars and some swings moth caterpillar’s but I can’t put my finger on what this is there are no Morance I touched him he’s very smooth didn’t exhibit any need anything as far as touching him
Signature: From Jenny

P.S.  Not swings Sphinx
And he was very smooth

Probably Hornless Hornworm

Unknown Caterpillar

Dear Jenny,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is a hornless Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  Are you certain this is a vanilla orchid?  It looks to us like a
Hoya, a plant with milky sap, related to milkweed in the family Apocynaceae.  We tried to identify your caterpillar on the Sphingidae Larvae of Miami-Dade County, Florida site, but with no luck.  It is possible this is a tropical introduction that has not yet been reported in Florida, and it is also possible that this is an unusual color form of a more common species.  Several hornless caterpillars in the genus Erinnyis are listed as feeding on plants from the aforementioned family.  Caterpillars in the genus Eumorpha are also hornless.  We are contacting Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information on this critter’s identity. 

Probably Hornless Hornworm

Unknown Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke Responds
I do not recognize it as a Sphingidae species.
I think it belongs to another family

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Florida

3 Responses to Unknown Caterpillar

  1. Ben says:

    Looks like Noctua pronuba to me.

  2. Marcelo Brito de Avellar says:

    Looks like Spodoptera littoralis to me. Just my opinion! Hugs!

  3. I agree with Spodoptera, dunno if littoralis, BugGuide does not recognize this species in U.S., seems to be Old World species.
    It must be S. dolichos http://bugguide.net/node/view/57552

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